Tanya Koonce

Peoria Police Officer Fatally Shoots 19-Year-Old After Traffic Stop

Authorities say a Peoria police officer fatally shot a 19-year-old man who fled from a vehicle after a traffic stop. Luis Cruz died overnight. The shooting happened just after midnight at West Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive and south Blaine Street.

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Illinois AG: DOJ Withholding Money From The State Over Immigration Policies

Champaign Police Sgt. Geoff Coon said he’s waiting on roughly $50,000 in federal grant money that’s due to the central Illinois police department. Another agency that uses the funding to pay for programs that focus on recidivism and re-entry and community-based violence intervention programs in the Rockford area also hasn’t received their funding this year.

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EU Hits Google With $5 Billion Fine For Pushing Apps On Android Users

Updated at 9:15 a.m. ET The European Commission has fined Google $5 billion for violating the European Union's antitrust rules — specifically, by forcing manufacturers of Android phones to install the Google search app and the Chrome Web browser. "Google has used Android as a vehicle to cement the dominance of its search engine," Commissioner Margrethe Vestager said in a statement. "These practices have denied rivals the chance to innovate and compete on the merits." The tech giant plans to...

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Community Events Calendar

Find out about events across central Illinois with Peoria Public Radio's community events calendar

This week, Jenn Gordon talks with Rebecca Shulman Herz, with the Peoria Playhouse Children's Museum; and with artist Reenie Charriere. Charriere is the artist in residence at the Playhouse. During her residency, she'll be creating a work of art called "Magic Carpet" in collaboration with members of the community.

The father of two students who survived the Parkland school shooting in February was himself fatally shot Tuesday while working at his convenience store.

Ayub Ali, 61, was restocking shelves at Aunt Molly's Food Store in North Lauderdale, Fla., when a man with a gun walked in around 12:40 p.m ET and lingered in the aisles.

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

The city of Oakland, Calif., is experiencing something of a renaissance moment in the movies. You could trace it back to 2013, when the Oakland-born director Ryan Coogler made Fruitvale Station, his ripped-from-the-headlines drama about the fatal police shooting of Oscar Grant III.

Ordering a "grande four-pump, nonfat, no-whip, extra-hot mocha" is a mouthful for any hot beverage nerd, but for deaf people, it can be hard to order just a simple cup of black coffee. Global coffee behemoth Starbucks' "Signing Store Project," launching in Washington, D.C. in October, aims to change that.

Adam Novsam, a deaf utility analyst at Starbucks headquarters in Seattle, knows firsthand how frustrating it can be to accomplish even the most basic transactions in the hearing world.

Not since a deadly famine was ravaging North Korea in 1997 has the country seen its economy contract at such a large rate as it did last year. After a couple of years of growth, the country's estimated gross domestic product went reeling in the other direction in 2017, shrinking 3.5 percent, according to South Korea's central bank.

The Trump administration has one week left to meet a court-ordered deadline to reunite over 2,000 children separated at the border from their families suspected of entering the U.S. illegally.

Logistically, it's going to be tough for the government. The children were sent to dozens of different shelters and foster homes around the United States, in many cases, thousands of miles from their detained parents.

Then there are dozens more parents who've already been deported without their children, further complicating the reunification process.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

On April 21, 2008, Florence Machinga lost everything. A mob of hundreds of people showed up at her house, demanded to see her — and, when she didn't materialize, burned it down.

"They destroyed everything," she says. "Cattle were slaughtered, the chickens were slaughtered."

This year we mark our annual summer Latin music festival show with an accompanying deeper dive into the reason some of these festivals exist: lack of inclusion on the big summer festival stages.

Listen to the podcast and read how the Latinx community is dealing with representation in the music industry.

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