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City Looks to Tech Community to Solve Complex Challenges

Road projects are often seen as a hassle to drivers, cyclists and pedestrians. That’s why the City of Peoria challenged developers at its first Hackathon this month to develop an app that would help users navigate the smattering of road closures and lane changes in the area.

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Thousands See Eclipse in Carbondale

About 14,000 people filled Southern Illinois University's Saluki Stadium in Carbondale to watch Monday's total solar eclipse. Thousands of people across southern Illinois witnessed a total solar eclipse Monday afternoon. WSIU’s Jennifer Fuller was on the campus of SIU Carbondale to see it for herself.

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In Solar Trade Dispute, Will Proposed Tariffs Cost Industry Jobs?

Before a solar project, Mark Holohan usually gives his customers plenty of time to mull over the cost. But lately, installers are scooping up panels so quickly that Holohan has trouble guaranteeing a price for too long. "We have a sort of panic buying mode in the marketplace right now. Inventories have fallen. Availability has decreased. Prices have risen," Holohan, the solar division manager at Wilson Electric, said over the clatter of machines and workers in the company's warehouse outside...

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LGBTQ rights activists say two pieces of legislation should be signed by the governor. Both passed the General Assembly unanimously.

A spokeswoman says Gov. Bruce Rauner will sign a plan that would limit cooperation between authorities in Illinois and federal immigration authorities.

A decades-long effort to clean up the Chesapeake Bay, the nation's largest estuary, is showing signs of success. But scientists now say progress could be hindered by a hydroelectric dam, located on the Susquehanna River in northern Maryland.

The Conowingo Dam has been holding back pollution for nearly a century, but recent research shows it has filled up with sediment faster than expected.

"It's now at a point where it's essentially, effectively full," says Bill Ball, director of the Chesapeake Research Consortium. "The capacity's been reached."

The developer behind the Dakota Access Pipeline, which for months drew thousands of protesters, has sued Greenpeace and several other environmental groups for their role in delaying the pipeline's construction.

The British publisher of an academic journal has reversed a decision to take down hundreds of articles from its Chinese website.

In a statement released Monday, Cambridge University Press said it's reosting the more than 300 articles to "The China Quarterly."

Family of Kidnapped U of I Scholar Speaks

59 minutes ago

The family of kidnapped U of I visiting scholar Yingying Zhang says they will not give up their search for her and Tuesday they asked President Donald Trump for help in finding her. 

The push for renewable energy in the U.S. often focuses on well-established sources of electricity: solar, wind and hydropower. Off the coast of California, a team of researchers is working on what they hope will become an energy source of the future — macroalgae, otherwise known as kelp.

This week's Trump presidency Internet sideshow (see also: Melania appearing to bat Trump's hand away, the president's aggressive handshakes, the frenzy over Kellyanne Conway's inauguration outfit) came in the form of a couture-heavy Instagram post from Louise Linton, a Scottish-born actr

The vicious shade-throwing by the Treasury secretary's wife, Louise Linton, Monday was intended to put an Instagram commenter on blast, but it almost immediately blew up in the Scottish-born actress' perfectly made-up face.

Now, nearly a full day later, the 36-year-old has apologized through a spokesperson.

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