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After Lawmaker Gives Birth, Senate Poised To Allow Infants In For Votes

Maile Pearl Bowlsbey is just over a week old and already she's helping force more change in the Senate than most seasoned lawmakers can even dream. She's doing it with the help of her mom, Illinois Democratic Sen. Tammy Duckworth. Duckworth gave birth to Maile, her second child, on April 9, and she wants to keep her newborn nearby when she's doing her job as a senator. That would require a change in Senate rules that typically allow only senators and a handful of staff into the Senate chamber...

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Lawmaker Response to State Workplace Violence Bills A Mixed Bag

Illinois state legislators and advocates say state employees need more protection from a growing trend of workplace violence. But statehouse measures addressing that have gotten a mixed reception. Listen to a summary of the story.

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What Adult Learners Really Need (Hint: It's Not Just Job Skills)

More than 2 out of 3 college students today are not coming straight out of high school. Half are financially independent from their parents, and 1 in 4 are parents themselves. David Scobey says that, as an American studies and history professor at the University of Michigan for decades, he was "clueless" about the needs of these adult students. But then, in 2010, he became a dean at The New School, a private college in New York City, heading a division that included a bachelor's degree...

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Maile Pearl Bowlsbey is just over 1 week old, and already she is helping to force more change in the U.S. Senate than most seasoned lawmakers can ever dream of doing. NPR's Kelsey Snell explains.

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In a new interview, fired FBI Director James Comey tells NPR that holding the job in 2016 felt like a 500-year flood. And there was no manual to tell him how to operate in it.

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A warning about the next four minutes - we're going to examine a grisly, tragic crime in northern India, one that also touches upon larger issues in that country. It's the story about the rape and murder of an 8-year-old girl.

T-Mobile has agreed to pay a $40 million fine to settle a federal investigation into its former practice of faking ring tones when calls couldn't connect in rural areas. The Federal Communications Commission announced the settlement Monday, saying that in the course of the agency's investigation, T-Mobile acknowledged it had injected such false ring tones into "hundreds of millions of calls."

They made children wear socks until they got good and smelly.

Later on, they decapitated mosquitoes.

Those were two steps in an ... unusual ... study to learn why female mosquitoes (males don't bite) are more likely to feed on people with malaria than non-infected people.

But scientists haven't known exactly how the parasite that causes malaria, called Plasmodium, pulls off this manipulation

President Trump will not meet the federal deadline to file his 2017 tax return in April, the White House said.

"The president filed an extension for his 2017 tax return, as do many Americans with complex returns," White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said in a statement.

Sanders said Trump will file his returns by Oct. 15, the deadline set by the IRS for taxpayers who ask for extensions.

Trump has bucked decades of tradition by not releasing his tax returns to the public.

Starbucks has come under intense criticism after a video emerged last week of two black men being arrested inside one of the coffee chain's Philadelphia locations.

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