Peoria's 3 High Schools Will Have Police Officers

Peoria Public High Schools will have an assigned Peoria Police Officer starting next year. It seemed like a fairly straightforward issue. Should the city provide a Peoria police officer to each of the three Peoria public high schools at 47 dollars per hour? But before the vote, councilman Chuck Grayeb criticized Peoria schools for lack of student discipline. Councilwoman Denise Moore responded that there are limitations on teachers. Grayeb says, when we have a huge call for service tying up...

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Federal Net Neutrality Protections End Despite State Opposition

Federal net neutrality protections ended Monday, despite Illinois lawmakers attempting to block the move earlier this year. Democrats in both the Illinois House and Senate worked feverishly to get some kind of net neutrality measure passed ahead of the rollback, but to no avail. Its supporters say changing the Obama-era rules allows internet companies to prioritize some websites and content over other kinds. Ed Yohnka of ACLU Illinois says internet users should have the right to choose what...

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Migrant Ship, With Italian Support, Will Make Dayslong Journey To Spain

The migrant rescue ship Aquarius, which was left stranded in the Mediterranean Sea after Italy and Malta closed their ports to it, is heading off on a three-day journey to Spain — with help from the same countries that turned it away. After the ship rescued migrants off the coast of Libya over the weekend, Italy said it wanted the rest of Europe to take the passengers; Malta said this ship was clearly Italy's responsibility. So Spain announced Monday that it would open the port of Valencia to...

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Community Events Calendar

Find out about events across central Illinois with Peoria Public Radio's community events calendar

Israel, Germany and Canada are among the countries that have already marched down the path the U.S. will soon follow in allowing women a role in front-line combat units.

And most experts say the integration of women into such roles elsewhere has gone smoothly, despite concerns as to whether they would be up to the physical demands and about the question of fraternization between male and female troops.

Saying he is choosing "one of my closest friends and one of my closest advisers" for the job, President Obama on Friday said that longtime aide Denis McDonough will be his next chief of staff.

During a midday event at the White House that was remarkable for the expansive comments the president made about his friend's character, his dedication and the respect he gets from those who work in the administration, Obama said McDonough has "the kind of heart that I want in the White House."

A hubbub's been building up north for the past week or so about the maple leaf on Canada's new $20 bills.

Though there was a 7.3 percent drop in sales of new homes in December from November, sales were up a healthy 8.8 percent from December 2011, the Census Bureau and Department of Housing and Urban Development report.

Homes sold at a annual rate of 369,000 last month.

Over the whole year, the agencies estimate, there were 367,000 new homes sold — up 19.9 percent from the 306,000 sold in 2011.

A Brief History Of Women In Combat

Jan 25, 2013

Traditions break down fast during times of war, and history is full of examples where women assumed dramatic new roles that never would have been possible in times of peace.

As this photo gallery shows, the pressing demands of World War II led many countries to call on women to bolster their armed forces, in jobs ranging from nurse to front-line soldier.

From Madrid, correspondent Lauren Frayer writes:

Editors at Spain's El País newspaper thought they had a scoop: The first glimpse in more than six weeks of cancer-stricken Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez.

A large, blurry photo above the fold on Thursday's front page showed a chubby-faced, bald man on an operating table surrounded by doctors, with a breathing tube in his mouth. A caption identified the ailing patient as Chavez, who is undergoing cancer treatment in Cuba.

Good morning.

The stories making headlines today include:

-- " 'March For Life' Rally Expected To Draw Huge Crowd In Washington." (Our first post of the day.)

-- "Snow, Ice Target Midwest, East." (The Weather Channel)

Organizers say today's March for Life rally in the nation's capital may bring more anti-abortion activists to the streets than last year's estimated 400,000. By midday, a large crowd was gathered in the National Mall, listening to speeches from former GOP presidential contender Rick Santorum and others and preparing to march toward the Capitol and the Supreme Court.

Congressional Democrats appeared on Capitol Hill Thursday to push for a new ban on assault weapons and high-capacity magazines.

The bill's author, Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California, started her remarks with a roster of tragedy: "Columbine. Virginia Tech. Aurora. Tucson. Oak Creek. The common thread in these shootings is each gunman used a semiautomatic assault weapon or large-capacity ammunition magazine."

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