The Two-Way
7:45 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Nation Pauses To Mark Sept. 11 Attacks

A woman looks out at One World Trade Center from inside the 9/11 Empty Sky memorial at Liberty State Park in Jersey City, N.J., on Wednesday. Americans commemorated the 12th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks with solemn ceremonies and pledges to not forget the nearly 3,000 people killed.
Gary Hershorn Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 11:51 am

It was just after 8:45 a.m. ET on Sept. 11, 2001, when the first jet struck the World Trade Center in New York City and the worst terrorist attack in the nation's history began. Nearly 3,000 people died.

At that time this morning, many Americans paused for a moment of silence. President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama were among them.

Read more
This Is NPR
7:44 am
Wed September 11, 2013

You've Tracked Down Hundreds Of Accessible Playgrounds. Help Us Find More!

NPR designer Alyson Hurt's early sketch of the interface for editing accessible playgrounds.
Alyson Hurt NPR

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 8:05 am

When NPR launched a national guide to accessible playgrounds two weeks ago, we knew it wasn't perfect.

It's not perfect because there isn't an official, comprehensive database of playgrounds with components designed for kids with special needs available to use as a source.

Read more
State News
7:02 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Gov. suspends funding for Capitol renovations

Illinois’ capitol was designed in the late 1800s. Critics are upset about the money spent restoring the statehouse to what architect J. Richard Alsop III calls its “period of historic significance,” with fixtures like this statue of a maiden – which cost approximately $40,000.
Credit Amanda Vinicky / IPR/WUIS

Governor Pat Quinn has suspended funding for future renovations at the Capitol, a pricey project that's already caused embarrassment for financially-shaky Illinois and raised questions about how it was allowed. 

Read more
State News
6:54 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Quinn and Daley begin attacks

The Illinois gubernatorial primary might be months away, but two top Democratic candidates are already battling it out in public. IPR'S Lauren Chooljian reports.

Former White House chief of staff Bill Daley has laid out a laundry list of reasons why he thinks Governor Pat Quinn isn’t quote, "up for the job." Daley says Quinn hasn’t done enough to fix a backlog of FOID card applications, he accused him of not meeting with the joint pension committee, and says the governor hasn’t done enough to reduce unemployment.

Read more
Politics
6:54 am
Wed September 11, 2013

U.S. Fleshes Out Russian Plan For Syria's Chemical Weapons

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

President Obama last night urged a strike on Syria that he is not yet ready to order and that the country seems unready to accept.

Read more
It's All Politics
6:54 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Obama's Shift On Syria: A Show Of Strength Or Fear?

President Obama walks along the West Wing Colonnade toward the Oval Office ahead of Tuesday night's speech on Syria.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 10:00 am

One line President Obama might have borrowed for his speech to the nation Tuesday night was a famous one from John F. Kennedy's inauguration address: "Let us never negotiate out of fear, but let us never fear to negotiate."

Always admired as a fine turn of phrase, what meaning does this have in our own time?

Perhaps it might have helped Obama make the turn from indicting the Syrian regime's alleged use of chemical weapons to explaining why he backed off his own earlier threat of military retaliation against Syria.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:47 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Anthony Weiner's Run Ends With A Flourish Of His Finger

Anthony Weiner on Tuesday, before the results came in and before he waved goodbye.
Eduardo Munoz Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 7:55 am

Voters in New York City are waiting to see whether Democratic mayoral candidate Bill de Blasio reached the 40 percent point that would avoid an Oct. 1 runoff with challenger William Thompson.

With about 98 percent of precincts having reported the results from Tuesday's voting, our colleagues at WNYC say that de Blasio has 40.19 percent of the vote to Thompson's 26.04 percent.

If de Blasio is declared the winner, he would face Republican Joe Lhota in November.

Read more
State News
6:44 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Illinois students underperform on state standardized tests

Newly-released results say Illinois students did not score as well on this year's standardized tests. But as IPR'S Brian Mackey reports, officials say that's because they've made the tests tougher.

Many parents could see scores that say their child is not meeting state standards. The number of students meeting or exceeding Illinois' benchmarks on the Illinois Standards Achievement Test dropped from 82 percent last year to 62 percent this year.

Read more
Europe
6:14 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Authorities Discover Vodka Vending Machine

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 6:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. We've told you about baguettes in France offered in vending machines and bars of gold in Abu Dhabi. Now we can report on a vending machine selling vodka in Ukraine. For a dollar, patrons could enjoy a shot in the town center of Melitopol, mixers also available - until the machine was discovered by authorities. Unlawfully produced vodka is widespread in Ukraine and the vodka vending machine - a converted coffee maker. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Book Reviews
6:03 am
Wed September 11, 2013

In These 'Gardens,' The Tree Rings Of The Radical Left

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 4:48 pm

Mohsin Hamid's latest novel is called How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia.

Jonathan Lethem's latest novel, Dissident Gardens, is expansive in scale. Chronologically speaking, it begins in the 1930s with Communist Party meetings in the U.S. It passes through the rise of McCarthyism, the establishment of the New York Mets, the hippie Age of Aquarius and the AIDS crisis. It ventures briefly abroad, to such places as behind-the-Iron-Curtain East Germany and war-torn Nicaragua. It ends in the Obama era of Occupy sit-ins and a rampant TSA.

Read more

Pages