State News
11:21 am
Fri October 4, 2013

Unanswered questions on state's decision to drop Health Alliance for retirees

The head of one Illinois retirees group says there are many unanswered questions regarding the state’s recent decision to remove Health Alliance from its list of Medicare providers in 2014. Linda Brookhart is the executive director of the State Universities Annuitants Association, which advocates for higher education retirees. She expects delays in setting up relationships with new doctors, since those currently on Health Alliance can’t use Carle Hospital, and may have to travel as far as Springfield for care.  

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The Two-Way
11:21 am
Fri October 4, 2013

Tasteless Or Not? Restaurant Puts Communion Wafer On Burger

The controversial burger, which comes with an unconsecrated communion wafer, at the Kuma's Corner restaurant in Chicago.
AP

Kuma's Corner, a Chicago restaurant that's built a reputation with foodies for its venturesome dishes, "has cooked up a controversial burger of the month for October, garnishing it with an unconsecrated communion wafer and a red wine reduction sauce," The Associated Press says.

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Shots - Health News
10:48 am
Fri October 4, 2013

Despite Many Warnings, Antibiotics Are Still Overprescribed

Unless it's strep throat, antibiotics are unlikely to help you get over a sore throat.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 3:25 pm

We've known for years that antibiotics don't help in most cases of bronchitis or sore throat. And for decades, public health officials have tried to stop doctors from overprescribing antibiotics.

None of that seems to have made a difference, though: Antibiotics are still being prescribed when they don't help — and could hurt, a study says.

Primary care and emergency room doctors are prescribing antibiotics for a sore throat about 60 percent of the time, according to national health surveys between 1997 and 2010.

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Politics
10:37 am
Fri October 4, 2013

Government Shutdown? 'This Is Democracy In Action'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. After decades of litigation, checks are going out this week to thousands of black farmers who - lawmakers eventually agreed - faced discrimination by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. We'll speak with one of the people who helped lead the fight for years, even though he will not personally benefit. That's in just a few minutes.

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Race
10:37 am
Fri October 4, 2013

Will Settlement Bring Black Farmers Dignity?

After years of discrimination from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, black farmers are now getting a $1.25 billion settlement. Founder and president of the National Black Farmers Association John Boyd tells host Michel Martin what this settlement means for farmers and their families.

Barbershop
10:37 am
Fri October 4, 2013

New York Road Rage Video Raises Difficult Questions

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Two-Way
10:28 am
Fri October 4, 2013

Vietnamese General Who Led Fight Against U.S., France, Dies

Gen. Vo Nguyen Giap (back) with Vietnamese President Ho Chi Minh (second from right) and other advisers in 1950.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 11:16 am

Vo Nguyen Giap, the Vietnamese general who masterminded the defeat of French colonial forces at Dien Bien Phu and the Tet Offensive that turned many Americans against the Vietnam War, has died at 102.

Giap, whose legacy in Vietnam is second only to Ho Chi Minh, the revolutionary communist leader, died Friday at a hospital in the capital, Hanoi, a government official tells news agencies.

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The Two-Way
10:24 am
Fri October 4, 2013

'This Isn't Some Damn Game!' Boehner Says

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 12:28 pm

"This isn't some damn game!" House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, just declared, his voice rising, as he told reporters on Capitol Hill that he believes it's the Obama administration that's to blame for the four-day-old partial shutdown of the federal government.

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Parallels
10:20 am
Fri October 4, 2013

Do You Know What The U.S. Government Is Up To In Syria?

Syrian youths line up for food distribution in the Maiber al-Salam refugee camp in northern Syria, near the border with Turkey. The U.S. government has provided more than $1.5 billion in aid to Syrians since the uprising began in 2011.
Dimitar Dilkoff AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 8:47 am

Mark Ward is the U.S. State Department's senior adviser on assistance to Syria, and when he heard the Syrian border town of Azaz was overrun by an offshoot of al-Qaida in September, he knew it was time to get creative again.

"You always have to have a plan B in this kind of work," he says.

Ward is based in Turkey. His job is to oversee a growing and unusual U.S. humanitarian assistance program in rebel-held areas in seven provinces across northern Syria.

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Interviews
10:04 am
Fri October 4, 2013

Pioneering 'Masters Of Sex' Brought Science To The Bedroom

Human sexuality researchers William Masters and Virginia Johnson Masters, shown in San Francisco in 1972.
AP

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 12:58 pm

This interview was originally broadcast on July 30, 2013.

William Masters and Virginia Johnson became famous in the 1960s for their groundbreaking and controversial research into the physiology of human sexuality. Instead of just asking people about their sex lives, Masters and Johnson actually observed volunteers engaging in self-stimulation and sexual intercourse. Changes throughout their bodies during arousal were measured with medical equipment.

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