Parallels
3:45 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

In Symbolic Move, U.S. Cuts Trade Privileges For Bangladesh

Garment factory workers come out from a building during a lunch break in Dhaka, Bangladesh, in June. Many Bangladeshi garment factories are considered to be poorly constructed.
A.M. Ahad AP

The U.S. suspended some trade benefits to Bangladesh on Thursday, citing unsafe working conditions. But in the near term it appears unlikely to have a major impact on the country's crucial garment industry.

Here's why: Bangladesh was suspended from the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) program, so U.S. duties will rise on a range of items from tobacco to plastic. But this program doesn't cover garments — Bangladesh's main export to America.

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Peoria Public Radio News
3:31 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

Goodfield officials break ground on green manufacturing facility

Chip Energy manufacturing facility in Goodfield

The cargo containers you see on ocean vessels and trains are being used to make an industrial manufacturing facility in Goodfield. Chip Energy, state, and village officials broke ground on the building Thursday that will be made up of 60 metal containers once complete.

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Peoria Public Radio News
3:13 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

Slight drop in area unemployment

The area’s unemployment rate dropped slightly from April to May. But the rate is up nearly one percent from last May.  The Illinois Department of Employment Security reports 7.8 percent of people living in the Metropolitan Statistical Area filed unemployment claims in May.

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Shots - Health News
2:51 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

How Head Injuries Seem To Affect The Risk For Stroke

The cause of strokes in younger people remains largely a mystery.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 2:47 pm

Twenty percent of strokes hit people under age 65, and the cause of many of those strokes remains a mystery. Having had a concussion or other traumatic brain injury might make the risk of a stroke more likely, a study says.

Back in 2011, researchers in Taiwan had unearthed an association between traumatic brain injury and stroke by combing through hospital records.

It's one of those "Oh, really?" findings that gets scientists itching to check it out themselves.

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Author Interviews
2:02 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

'Americanah' Author Explains 'Learning' To Be Black In The U.S.

iStockPhoto.com

When the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie was growing up in Nigeria she was not used to being identified by the color of her skin. That changed when she arrived in the United States for college. As a black African in America, Adichie was suddenly confronted with what it meant to be a person of color in the United States. Race as an idea became something that she had to navigate and learn.

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Movie Reviews
2:01 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

Two Master Moviemakers, Two Singularly Fine Films

Saoirse Ronan plays Eleanor, an ancient (and uncharacteristically ethical) vampire in Neil Jordan's Byzantium.
IFC Films

The decade of the 1980s — when major corporations made their presence more felt in Hollywood — was for all kinds of reasons a low point in American moviegoing. But two beacons abroad, Pedro Almodovar and Neil Jordan, reminded us with movies like Law of Desire, Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown and Mona Lisa how films could be personal and still reach a large (or large-ish) audience.

Thirty years later, we have Almodovar's I'm So Excited and Jordan's Byzantium — and these directors are still shining a light.

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All Tech Considered
2:01 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

What You Suggested For Our Tech Blog Reboot

An old innovation: the printing press.
Flickr: Mattack

In case you missed it Monday, we're rebooting our technology blog to focus on the intersection of innovation and culture. The updated approach both widens our view of technology — for example, two-ply toilet paper was innovative at one point — and sharpens our gaze. You won't find general tech business news in this space anymore.

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The Two-Way
1:57 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

NFL's Aaron Hernandez Loses Appeal For Bail In Murder Case

Former New England Patriots tight end Aaron Hernandez will be held without bail on murder charges, a judge has confirmed. Here, Hernandez, left, stands with one his defense attorneys, Michael Fee, during his arraignment in Attleboro District Court Wednesday.
Mike George AP

NFL tight end Aaron Hernandez, who was charged with first-degree murder and weapons crimes Wednesday, will not be released on bail, the Fall River Superior Court has ruled. Hernandez, 23, was released by the New England Patriots within hours of his arrest yesterday.

While Hernandez's defense attorney, Jamie Sultan, said that releasing a murder suspect on bail was a possibility, the judge in the bail hearing replied that it was "very rare."

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Arts & Life
1:33 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

So Hard To Say Goodbye: Advice For Farewell Notes

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 3:37 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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Around the Nation
1:33 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

Hopes And Fears For The Future Of The World, With Ted Koppel

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 9:49 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. As some of you may know, this program began in the crisis that led up to what we now call the first Gulf War, in 1991, as Daniel Schorr and I anchored live coverage of briefings from the White House and the Pentagon and congressional hearings.

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