Race
4:38 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Game Of Change: Pivotal Matchup Helped End Segregated Hoops

Mississippi State's Stan Brinker (53) and Loyola's Jerry Harkness (15) shake hands before the NCAA Mideast regional semifinal college basketball game in East Lansing, Mich., on March 15, 1963. The game was a landmark contest between the schools that helped alter race relations on the basketball court.
Loyola University Chicago AP

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 9:14 pm

During the March Madness of 1963, playing was infused with politics. The NCAA matchup between Loyola University of Chicago and Mississippi State helped put an end to segregated basketball. Loyola's win 50 years ago became known as the "game of change."

At the time, college basketball was still predominantly white, with usually no more than two or three black players appearing on the floor at any one time. But in '63, the Loyola Ramblers' starting lineup featured four black players.

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NPR Story
4:12 am
Fri March 15, 2013

JPMorgan In Hot Seat Over London Whale Losses

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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StoryCorps
4:12 am
Fri March 15, 2013

A 'Good Enough' Dad And His Special Son

Tim Harris (right) and his father, Keith, visited StoryCorps in their hometown of Albuquerque, N.M.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 9:53 am

In Albuquerque, N.M., there's a restaurant called Tim's Place. It's named after Tim Harris, a young man with Down syndrome who started the business in 2010 with help from his dad, Keith.

Six days a week, Tim greets each customer at the door. He calls it the world's friendliest restaurant.

The day Tim's Place opened "felt awesome," Tim, 27, tells his father on a visit to StoryCorps. "I wanted to own a restaurant ever since I was a kid. That was my dream."

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Law
4:12 am
Fri March 15, 2013

50 Years After Key Case, Problems Defending The Poor Persist

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 5:50 am

Next week marks the 50th anniversary of the landmark Supreme Court decision in which the justices unanimously ruled that defendants facing substantial jail time deserved legal representation in state courts, even if they couldn't afford to pay for it.

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The Salt
4:12 am
Fri March 15, 2013

A Daily Habit Of Green Tea Or Coffee Cuts Stroke Risk

Japanese women drink green tea during an outdoor tea ceremony in Kobe, Japan. Making the brew a daily habit may be protective against stroke.
Buddhika Weerasinghe Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 2:58 pm

Whether it's green tea that warms you up, or coffee that gives you that morning lift, a new study finds both can help cut the risk of suffering a stroke.

The study, published in the American Heart Association journal Stroke, included 82,369 men and women in Japan.

Researchers found that the more green tea a person drank, the more it reduced the risk of suffering a stroke.

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Energy
4:12 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Could Tapping Undersea Methane Lead To A New Gas Boom?

This photo from a Kyodo News helicopter shows a flame of natural gas from a Japanese deep-sea drilling ship on Tuesday. This successful extraction of methane from the seafloor was a world first.
Kyodo Landov

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 9:38 am

The new boom in natural gas from shale has changed the energy economy of the United States. But there's another giant reservoir of natural gas that lies under the ocean floor that, theoretically, could dwarf the shale boom.

No one had tapped this gas from the seabed until this week, when Japanese engineers pulled some up through a well from under the Pacific. The gas at issue here is called methane hydrate. Methane is natural gas; hydrate means there's water in it. In this case, the molecules of gas are trapped inside a sort of cage of water molecules.

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National Security
4:12 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Is All The Talk About Cyberwarfare Just Hype?

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper says the danger of a devastating cyberattack is the No. 1 threat facing the U.S. He made the assessment Tuesday on Capitol Hill before the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on worldwide threats.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 9:00 am

U.S. government pronouncements about the danger of a major cyberattack can be confusing. The director of national intelligence, James Clapper, and the head of the U.S. military's Cyber Command, Army Gen. Keith Alexander, delivered mixed messages this week while testifying on Capitol Hill.

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Crime
11:42 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Push for new DNA testing in Savory murder case

The legal team representing Johnny Savory was back in a Peoria Courtroom Thursday. The Center on Wrongful Convictions of Youth and Northwestern Law Students are asking, among other things, to have new DNA technology applied to the blood evidence in the 36-year-old double murder cases for which Savory is convicted. Savory was 14 years-old at the time of the gruesome murders of 14-year-old James Robinson and 19-year-old Connie Cooper. He was paroled in 2006. Savory contends his conviction was unjust: 

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Government
11:37 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Peoria County continues review of proposed septic rules

The Peoria County Board deferred a vote to approve new rules to manage independent waste-water systems. Peoria Public Radio’s Alex Rusciano reports the move comes after realtors and other groups say they weren’t involved in crafting the proposed changes: 

 The Peoria City/County Health Department is proposing changes that would require people requesting permits for repairs to prove the rest of their system is up to code.  Another proposed change would make inspectors to eventually follow guidelines when examining a home’s waste-water system prior to selling it.  But the Peoria Area Association of Realtors and some residents say they weren’t included in the process of crafting the rules.  County Board member Lynn Scott Pearson says County staff were transparent in communicating the proposed changes:
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Peoria Public Radio News
7:30 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Short-term layoffs continue at Caterpillar

Caterpillar is expected to continue with short-term layoffs   beyond the first quarter as originally anticipated. Randy Smith is with UAW Local 974. He says the rolling layoffs are expected to continue through May, but the company has not yet said how wide reaching the layoffs might be. Caterpillar is also reportedly reducing its flexible workforce of contractual employees. Cat spokesman Jim Dugan says the company will continue with short-term layoffs as needed to keep production in line with demand.

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