Europe
6:59 am
Sat May 10, 2014

Russia's Independent Media All But Silenced

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 5:25 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Asia
6:59 am
Sat May 10, 2014

Chinese Find Number URLs Easier Than Letters

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 10:44 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. A lot of Chinese websites seem to have a different form of URLs or web addresses. They use numbers not the names, long numbers too, seemingly at random. McDonald's website isn't spelled McDonald's, it's 4008-517-517.cn. A dating website is 5201314.com. Why? Christopher Beam, staff writer with The New Republic who lives in Beijing, wondered and that's when he began to notice that the numbers are hardly random. Mr. Beam joins us from Beijing. Thanks very much for being with us.

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Africa
6:59 am
Sat May 10, 2014

How Much Can The U.S. Do For Kidnapped Nigerian Girls?

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 5:23 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. More than 250 Nigerian schoolgirls remain missing after being kidnapped by the terrorist group Boko Haram. The Nigerian government has faced criticism for being slow to react to the crime. And this week, the U.S. said it would send a small team of advisers to Nigeria as will the U.K., China and France. President Goodluck Jonathan thanked the international community at the World Economic Forum on Thursday.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

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Latin America
6:59 am
Sat May 10, 2014

Mexican Vigilantes Keep Arms Despite Deadline

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 5:28 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Mexican authorities have given vigilantes in the western state of Michoacan a deadline. By today, they've got to register their arms and either store them away or join an official police force.

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The Two-Way
6:51 am
Sat May 10, 2014

Michelle Obama: Nigerian Girls 'Embody The Best Hope For The Future'

Michelle Obama tweeted this picture of herself on May 7, in support of the kidnapped Nigerian girls.
Michelle Obama

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 10:48 am

In her first solo weekly address, first lady Michelle Obama said the U.S. is committed to standing up for the more than 200 Nigerian girls who were kidnapped from their school weeks ago.

"In these girls, Barack and I see our own daughters," she said. "We see their hopes and their dreams — and we can only imagine the anguish their parents are feeling right now."

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All Tech Considered
5:07 am
Sat May 10, 2014

Tech Week: Target CEO Out, Drones In Question, Apple's Big Deal

Beats headphones are sold alongside iPods in an Apple store in New York City. Apple is reportedly considering buying Beats for more than $3 billion.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Another week in tech is wrapping up with talk of another multi-billion dollar buy. Let's get to it with our roundup, starting with the ICYMI section, which features stories we've been telling on air and online, the Big Conversations in tech and closing with our Curiosities — other fun links you should see.

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Parallels
5:05 am
Sat May 10, 2014

How Loud Is Too Loud? A High-Decibel Debate On Expanding Heathrow

British schoolchildren outside an adobe hut that was built so they could play in a less noisy place when jets fly overhead. The kids go to school near London's Heathrow Airport, where a planes takeoff and land every 90 seconds.
Matt Dunham AP

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 10:44 am

Pippins Primary School is just one of dozens of schools in the neighborhoods that surround London's Heathrow Airport. At recess the students play outside on an asphalt playground. And like clockwork, a jet roars just several hundred feet overhead every 90 seconds. The school is almost directly under Heathrow's flight path.

"It is very loud. It's as if you were standing on the runways," said Janet Mills, a teacher at Pippins. Heathrow is one of the world's busiest airports, and every day Mills faces the challenge of teaching right next door to it.

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Code Switch
5:04 am
Sat May 10, 2014

With Great Korean Barbecue Comes Great Responsibility

As far as stock images go, this one of Korean barbecue seems pretty tasty.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 10:41 am

Go hunting for the best barbecue in America and you might end up in a city that surprises you: Los Angeles. Specifically, the L.A. neighborhood known as Koreatown.

I'm talking about Korean barbecue. If you're unfamiliar, that's thinly sliced, marinated meat grilled right in front of you. Trust me, it's awesome (this guy knows what I'm talking about).

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The Salt
5:03 am
Sat May 10, 2014

Bridging The Cultural Gap With A Mother-In-Law In The Kitchen

Lisa Brown for NPR

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 1:17 pm

In Indian kitchens, patience is a virtue.

Vegetables must be chopped, lentils soaked, spices roasted and ground before slowly simmering everything together. If you try to cut corners, the food just isn't the same.

The same is true for some relationships.

My mother-in-law, Rama Saini, grew up in north India in the early years after independence from the British. At age 19, her marriage was arranged and she moved to Canada with her husband. By 30 she had three children and a thriving business.

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It's All Politics
4:58 am
Sat May 10, 2014

The Congresswoman Whose Husband Called Her Home

Rep. Coya Knutson (D-Minn.), is shown shopping in a supermarket in 1955 following her demand to know why her fellow housewives remain saddled with high grocery bills while farm income continues to drop.
Maurice Johnson Bettmann/Corbis

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 7:06 am

Fifty-six years ago this weekend, newspapers across the nation told a sad tale of a family seemingly imploding.

At the center of the story was Coya Knutson, the opera-singing daughter of a Norwegian farmer, and the first woman from Minnesota elected to Congress.

Voted in on her own merits, not appointed to keep a late husband's seat warm for a successor, the trailblazing mother could only watch as vengeful party rivals, a manufactured scandal, and a feckless, alcoholic husband combined to sabotage her career.

It all came to a head on the eve of Mother's Day 1958.

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