State News
1:00 pm
Thu December 5, 2013

Pension lawsuit process could take years

Several state employee unions are expected to file a lawsuit right after Governor Pat Quinn signs legislation aimed at fixing Illinois’ pension crisis.  A University of Illinois law professor says that action will start a process that could last as long as two years.  John Colombo says any decisions will ultimately come from the state’s Supreme Court… but the process has to start in circuit court.  He expects unions to seek an injunction that would keep the reform plan from taking effect while the legal process plays out.  Colombo says a circuit court may or may not grant the injunction… but he says it would be hard to reverse a pension plan once it’s already in effect.

Read more
State News
12:55 pm
Thu December 5, 2013

Farm lobbyist says she's not concerned about threat of higher dairy prices

Fears that Congress won’t reach agreement on a new farm bill before the New Year have prompted House Speaker John Boehner to call for extending the old farm bill through January. That’s to avoid the expiration of some dairy subsidies. If those subsidies are allowed to expire on January first, the dairy price support formula would revert to 1949 levels, resulting in sharply higher prices for a gallon of milk.

Read more
Peoria Public Radio News
12:44 pm
Thu December 5, 2013

Clean up remains focused on debris removal in Washington

With flurries expected this weekend in central Illinois, Washington officials say cleanup is going smoothly. The hard hit city remains focused on debris removal. Sara Sparkman with the Tazewell County Emergency Management Agency says she doesn’t expect that to be held up because of this week’s weather.

Read more
The Salt
12:23 pm
Thu December 5, 2013

Fast-Food Workers Across The U.S. Cry Poverty Wages, Demand Better Pay

Fast-food workers march toward the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C., on Thursday. Similar rallies occurred in about 100 cities across the U.S.
Morgan Walker NPR

Originally published on Fri December 6, 2013 10:57 am

When you're making eight bucks an hour, which is pretty typical in the fast-food industry, it's tough to make ends meet.

And increasingly, the working poor are asking this question: Why am I living in poverty, even when I'm working full time?

Read more
Music Reviews
11:59 am
Thu December 5, 2013

William Parker's Abstract Grooves Collected In Box Set

William Parker.
Roberto Serra - Iguana Press Getty Images

Originally published on Thu December 5, 2013 1:55 pm

Steve Lacy used to say that the right partner can help you make music you couldn't get to by yourself. Take the quartet William Parker founded in 2000, for example. Parker's bass tone was always sturdy as a tree trunk, but power drummer Hamid Drake gives him lift. The upshot is that free jazz can swing, too. The quartet's front line is another firm partnership: quicksilver alto saxophonist Rob Brown and flinty trumpeter Lewis Barnes.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:32 am
Thu December 5, 2013

American Teacher Is Killed While Jogging In Benghazi, Libya

Originally published on Thu December 5, 2013 1:42 pm

An American chemistry teacher who spent more than a year teaching at an international school in Libya, was shot and killed Thursday in Benghazi.

The U.S. State Department identified the slain teacher as Ronald Thomas Smith II. He was 33 years old.

Read more
Race
11:02 am
Thu December 5, 2013

New York City's Fire Commissioner On Extinguishing Racial Gap

Salvatore Cassano smiles during a news conference following his swearing-in as New York City's fire commissioner.
Mary Altaffer AP

Originally published on Thu December 5, 2013 7:19 pm

Nearly 250 recruits to New York City's storied fire department graduated on Thursday. The graduating class looks a lot different from the ones before it: Sixty-two percent are members of minority groups. The department has been nearly 90 percent white, a very different demographic than New York City's population.

Read more
World
11:02 am
Thu December 5, 2013

Abortion In Haiti: Dangerous And Illegal

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We're going to spend some time today talking about issues in health, particularly in the developing world. Later, we're going to hear what it's like to be a trauma doctor in one of Africa's most populous and, yet, still underserved areas. And, hint, her house calls involve a helicopter. That's just ahead.

Read more
The Protojournalist
10:37 am
Thu December 5, 2013

Project Xpat: What It Means To Be An Expatriate

iStockphoto

When American expatriate Charles Trueheart was young, he lived all over the world — in Ankara, London, Saigon and Paris. His father was an American diplomat.

When Charlie was older, he moved back to the U.S. He went to college at Amherst. Eventually, he and his wife, Anne Swardson, became international correspondents for The Washington Post.

I was Charlie's editor at the Post for several stories. He is a lovely writer and a good friend.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:36 am
Thu December 5, 2013

Obama Tells Government To Ramp Up Its Renewable Energy Use

Originally published on Thu December 5, 2013 12:44 pm

This post was updated at 1:30 p.m. ET

President Obama says the U.S. government "must lead by example" when it comes to safeguarding the environment, so he's ordering federal agencies to use more clean energy.

Under a presidential memorandum out Thursday, each agency would have until 2020 to get 20 percent of its electricity from renewable supplies.

"Government agencies currently get less than 10 percent of their electricity from renewable sources such as solar and wind," NPR's Richard Harris reports. He adds that:

Read more

Pages