Architecture
2:03 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Size Does Matter, At Least In The Tallest Building Debate

The view from the Willis Tower, formerly known as Sears Tower, in Chicago.
FleishmanHillard

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 1:20 pm

There's a question that's looming over the new skyscraper at the World Trade Center site in New York: Should it count as the tallest building in the country?

The developers say yes. But by some measures, the Willis Tower in Chicago — formerly known as Sears Tower — can still lay claim to the title.

Now, an obscure organization known as the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat is preparing to settle the debate.

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Business
8:01 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

IL Lawmaker confident on ADM tax break bill

The State Senator who has worked out a deal with Archer Daniels Midland says the company should remain optimistic about its chances for a state tax deal, even though the General Assembly adjourned without passing one.  ADM, currently based in Decatur, is searching for a new global headquarters. Executives are considering Chicago, but have also toured other cities.

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Community
7:57 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Lincoln Tomb to close for repairs

Abraham Lincoln's final resting place will be off limits to visitors for a few months as repairs are made. 

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Courts
7:49 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Peoria County could change public defender contract process

A group of Peoria County officials could start looking at bidding out the county public defender service next year.  Peoria Public Radio's Alex Rusciano reports:
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Peoria Public Radio News
7:26 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Eureka College observes Berlin Wall anniversary

Political, military and academic officials observed the 24th Anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall yesterday at Eureka College.  Eureka has a section of the wall that fell, marking the end of the Cold War.  Former Illinois Governor Jim Edgar was one of the guest speakers to mark the anniversary.  He says the Berlin Wall fell because both President Ronald Reagan and Soviet statesman Mikhail Gorbachev were willing to compromise:

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Peoria Public Radio News
6:39 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Clock Tower Place open in East Peoria

  East Peoria celebrated the latest building newly opened for business in its downtown.

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Karen Feagins joined WJCT in 2005, and has worked in many different roles at the station in both radio and television. Her love of journalism and storytelling began in the 4th grade when she was named editor of the newspaper at her elementary school in Fort Walton Beach, Florida. Karen attended the University of Missouri to study Broadcast Journalism, and spent several years as a commercial television news reporter before finding her home in public broadcasting. She is now news director and head of radio programming WJCT, and assists with the production of "First Coast Connect."

Around the Nation
5:40 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

School Named For Former KKK Leader Reconsiders Its Legacy

Nathan Bedford Forrest served as the first grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. The high school that bears his name, now majority African-American, has been at the center of controversy for decades.
Mike Wintroath AP

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 7:41 pm

Duval County Public Schools is considering a name change for Nathan Bedford Forrest High School in Jacksonville, Fla. The school is named for a Confederate hero who was the first grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan — and after five decades of debate, there appears to be momentum for change.

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The Salt
5:39 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

How 17th Century Fraud Gave Rise To Bright Orange Cheese

Shelburne Farms' clothbound cheddar has a bright yellow color because it's made from the milk of cows that graze on grasses high in beta-carotene.
Courtesy of A. Blake Gardner

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 8:46 am

The news from Kraft last week that the company is ditching two artificial dyes in some versions of its macaroni and cheese products left me with a question.

Why did we start coloring cheeses orange to begin with? Turns out there's a curious history here.

In theory, cheese should be whitish — similar to the color of milk, right?

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Code Switch
5:13 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Striking Harmonies With The Jubilee Singers' Past And Present

Soprano Nigia Hunt is a junior at Durham School of the Arts. She and others are singing for Paul Kwami, auditioning for a solo in the Duke Performances concert.
Leoneda Inge/NPR

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 5:51 pm

The Fisk Jubilee Singers are known worldwide for their flawless voices and stellar performances of Negro spirituals. They're from Fisk University in Nashville, Tenn., but they travel around the world to perform their music. Negro spirituals were originally sung by slaves and remain tightly linked to African-American culture. Paul Kwami, the choir's musical director, said singing these spirituals was a way for slaves to lament their servitude, along with the hope of being free one day.

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