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Author Interviews
1:18 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

A Reclusive Novelist Reckons With His Legacy '& Sons'

New York City's Central Park
AnnaNem iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 1:56 pm

At the center of David Gilbert's new novel & Sons is a famous and famously reclusive writer in the J.D. Salinger model. It's a book about the writer as author of books, and as the father of sons — sons who don't feel nearly as warmly toward him as readers do. When & Sons begins, the writer, Andrew Newbold Dyer — or A.N. Dyer as he's known to his readers — is nearing 80.

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The Two-Way
12:47 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

After Braun's Suspension, Is A-Rod Next At Bat?

Alex Rodriguez during a July 13 game in Florida, where he was playing for the minor league Tampa Yankees while trying to recover from recent injuries.
Mike Carlson Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 7:50 pm

Is Ryan Braun just the leadoff hitter for a lineup of stars who, like him, will soon be suspended by Major League Baseball for their dealings with a Miami-area clinic that allegedly sold performance enhancing drugs?

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Code Switch
12:15 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

Your More/Less Ethnic-Sounding Name

Earlier this week, the Code Switch team got a note from a publicist named Hector Andres Silva who said he had some news to share.

Silva was ditching his nickname, "Andy," which he'd been using for two decades. Silva grew up in South America (his parents are Mexican and Colombian) and moved to Alexandria, Va., when he was 7.

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Remembrances
12:04 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

Carline Ray: A Pioneer For Women In Jazz Dies At 88

Carline Ray, who sang with The International Sweethearts of Rhythm and Mary Lou Williams died on July 18 at the age of 88.
Jazz Promo Services

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 1:56 pm

Pioneering musician Carline Ray died July 18 at age 88. In the 1940s, when it was difficult for women to be accepted as jazz musicians, Ray found a home in the all-female band The International Sweethearts of Rhythm as the guitarist and a featured vocalist. She was also a bass player who performed with Sy Oliver, Mercer Ellington and Mary Lou Williams.

Ray was born in Harlem in 1925 during the Harlem Renaissance. She graduated from Juilliard and the Manhattan School of Music. Her husband, Luis Russell, led his own band and worked as Louis Armstrong's music director.

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Parenting
11:15 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Are African-American Men 'Invisible?'

President Obama recently called on the nation to rally around young African-American men. But is that easier said than done? Host Michel Martin asks a panel of dads.

The Two-Way
11:14 am
Tue July 23, 2013

PHOTO: Japanese Commuters Tilt Train To Free Trapped Woman

When a woman slipped between a train and a station platform just north of Tokyo on Monday, about 40 commuters and railroad employees worked together to tilt the 32-ton subway car enough to one side so that she could be pulled to safety.

The Associated Press writes that the train car's suspension system "allows it to lean to either side, according to the Yomiuri newspaper, Japan's largest daily."

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Economy
11:09 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Part-Time Work On The Rise, But Is That A Good Thing?

The number of part-time workers has roughly doubled in the last few years. For most of those employees, that means short hours, erratic schedules and low pay. Host Michel Martin talks with NPR's Marilyn Geewax, and fast-food worker Amere Graham, about the high costs of part-time work.

The Two-Way
10:15 am
Tue July 23, 2013

MUST-SEE VIDEO: 'Whales Almost Eat Divers'

Those are two whales coming up from the water, just feet away from two divers off the coast of central California. The image is from a video, which has gone viral, taken on Saturday.
YouTube.com

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 11:19 am

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Shots - Health News
9:35 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Unusual Tick-Borne Virus Lurks In Missouri's Woods

A harmful trio (from left): a deer tick, lone star tick and dog tick.
Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 9:11 am

Last year, scientists got the chance to solve a medical mystery — well, at least half of it. This week the final puzzle pieces fell into place, as investigators tracked the newly identified virus to an eight-legged bug.

The mystery actually began with two Missouri farmers who came down with a strange illness in 2009. They had high fevers, diarrhea and nausea. Their platelet counts dropped dramatically, though they didn't experience any abnormal bleeding.

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The Two-Way
9:09 am
Tue July 23, 2013

No-Fly Zone In Syria Could Cost $1B A Month, U.S. General Says

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Martin Dempsey.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 9:54 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': The World Food Program's Muhannad Hadi talks about the crisis in Syria

On the heels of another deadly day in Syria — where about 100,000 people have died in the past two years and several million more have been displaced by battles between government forces and those trying to topple President Bashar Assad's regime — we're getting a look at what the USA's top general thinks about the options available to the U.S. for intervening militarily.

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