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The Two-Way
9:10 am
Sun October 13, 2013

U.S. Olympic Committee Adds Sexual Orientation To Anti-Discrimination Rules

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 3:29 pm

Months ahead of the Winter Olympics in Russia, where controversy surrounds a law that targets homosexuality, the U.S. Olympic Committee adds protection against discrimination based on sexual orientation to its policies.

"The fact that we do not think it is our role to advocate for a change in the Russian law does not mean that we support the law, and we do not," USOC CEO Scott Blackmun said.

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Planet Money
8:56 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Models, Rules And High School Dropouts: A Guide To The Economics Nobel

The Nobel Foundation

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 2:27 pm

While a few gamblers bet real money on potential Nobel Prize winners, at Planet Money we're content to merely speculate. We're particularly interested in who might win the economics prize, which will be announced Monday morning.

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The Two-Way
8:48 am
Sun October 13, 2013

U.S. Reaches Partial Deal To Keep Troops In Afghanistan

Secretary of State John Kerry describes a new partial bilateral security agreement with Afghanistan, in a news conference held Saturday after hours of discussions with Afghan President Hamid Karzai, right.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Two days of talks between U.S. and Afghan officials have yielded a partial security agreement between the two countries. Secretary of State John Kerry and President Hamid Karzai held discussions Friday and Saturday on a deal to keep the U.S. military in the country beyond the 2014 pullout date for most U.S. and NATO troops.

The next step for the tentative bilateral security agreement is for it to be reviewed by Afghanistan's parliament and the Loya Jirga, an assembly of public and tribal leaders.

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The Two-Way
7:47 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Stampede On Indian Temple Bridge Kills Dozens

Indian villagers on tractors move past victims of a stampede on a bridge across the Sindh River in Madhya Pradesh state, India, on Sunday. Dozens of people died after a panic broke out.
AP

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 3:27 pm

At least 89 people reportedly died in a stampede Sunday at a temple in central India, where 25,000 people had crowded onto a bridge. Police believe a rumor that the bridge was collapsing sparked panic and confusion, according to local media.

Update at 12:15 p.m. ET: More Deaths Reported

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Parallels
6:11 am
Sun October 13, 2013

A Decade On, A Boy, A Ball And A West Bank Wall

A decade ago, Israel's separation barrier cut off Ishaq Amer's home from its Palestinian village.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 7:29 am

A little more than a decade ago, in an effort to improve security, Israel began building a physical barrier in and around the West Bank.

The Amer family is among the Palestinians whose lives were disrupted. The concrete wall and fence cut them off from their village. Their son was separated from his soccer buddies, the most important thing in the world to him at the time.

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It's All Politics
4:41 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Senate Gets A Dose Of Scolding With Its Morning Prayer

Senate Chaplain Barry C. Black has been using his morning prayer to express his displeasure with political gridlock.
Drew Angerer AP

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 2:21 pm

It's easy to tune out when the Senate goes through its morning rituals. The president pro tem calls the chamber to order; there's the Pledge of Allegiance. One morning could sound like any other.

Except for the past two weeks. Barry C. Black, the Senate chaplain, has been using his morning prayers to say exactly what he thinks is wrong with Washington lawmakers: "Remove from them that stubborn pride, which imagines itself to be above and beyond criticism."

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The Salt
4:38 am
Sun October 13, 2013

(Cabbage) Heads Will Roll: How To Make A Food Network 'From Scratch'

According to journalist Allen Salkin, Emeril Lagasse initially opposed bringing Rachael Ray, pictured here in 2007, onto the Food Network – and, at first, Ray agreed with him. "You have this all wrong," she told executives, "I'm beer in a bottle; you guys are champagne."
Scott Gries Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 7:47 am

Mario Batali, Guy Fieri and Rachael Ray are just a few of the stars the Food Network helped create. But what the network gave, it could also take away.

In From Scratch, author Allen Salkin takes an unsparing look at the network's progression from struggling cable startup to global powerhouse, and the people — Emeril Lagasse, Paula Deen — who rose and fell along the way.

Salkin tells NPR's Rachel Martin that while the network was intended for cooks, it wasn't run by them.

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Parallels
4:38 am
Sun October 13, 2013

For Myanmar's Kachin Rebels, Life Teeters Between War, Peace

Members of the Kachin Independence Army train at a refugee camp in northern Myanmar.
Anthony Kuhn NPR

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 5:04 pm

Despite progress in its transition to democracy, Myanmar has struggled to end all the ethnic insurgencies that have long divided the country.

Now the Kachin — the last of the insurgent groups that have been fighting the government — have signed a preliminary agreement that could end the conflict.

The agreement falls short of an actual cease-fire, but calls for both sides to work "to end all armed fighting."

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Afghanistan
4:29 pm
Sat October 12, 2013

Taken By The Taliban: A Doctor's Story Of Captivity, Rescue

Dr. Dilip Joseph, standing, teaches medical personnel in Afghanistan.
Courtesy of Dilip Joseph

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 5:04 pm

The U.S. has been fighting the war in Afghanistan for more than 12 years, and few Americans have come to know the country in the way Dilip Joseph has. Joseph, who has been there 10 times in the past four and a half years, is a doctor who works with a nonprofit group and trains health care workers.

The job has taken him to clinics and community centers deep in the war zone. "The motto is to 'work yourself out of a job,' " he says. "Equip others, train others in areas where you've gotten training."

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The Two-Way
4:20 pm
Sat October 12, 2013

Malala On Nobel Prize: 'I Think I Have Won' With Nomination

During her trip to Washington this week, Nobel Peace Prize nominee Malala Yousafzai met President Barack Obama, first lady Michelle Obama, and their daughter Malia Obama in the Oval Office.
The White House Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 5:00 pm

  • Malala Yousafzai, 16, and her father, Ziauddin

It seems odd to say that someone "lost" the Nobel Peace Prize. But that's what some folks were saying this week about Malala Yousafzai, who was favored to win the award because of the resilience she showed after being shot in the head by the Taliban.

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