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3:16 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

'Boondocks' Returns After Four Years To An Altered Comedy Landscape

Riley, Granddad and Huey in a scene from the "Breaking Granddad" episode of the animated series The Boondocks.
AP

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 6:26 pm

When celebrity chef Paula Deen got in trouble for maybe being racist last year, I couldn't help but think about The Boondocks. The Deen controversy, and all of the comedic potential it provided, seemed to be perfect fodder for an episode of the Peabody Award-winning show that airs on Cartoon Network's Adult Swim.

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Around the Nation
3:16 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

Some In Irwindale Still Not Happy About Smelly Neighbor, Sriracha

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 6:26 pm

The skirmish continues between Sriracha and Irwindale, Calif. Irwindale's city council declared that owner David Tran must curb his hot sauce factory's smelly fumes or they'll do it themselves. Tran is considering relocating, and he has already received several offers.

Parallels
3:14 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

Made In The USA: Childless Chinese Turn To American Surrogates

After failed attempts with Chinese surrogates, Tony Jiang and his wife now have three children, thanks to an American surrogate.
Aly Song Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 1:46 pm

Chinese couples who are unable to have children are turning to a surprising place for help these days: America. By hiring American surrogates, Chinese couples get around a ban on surrogacy in China, as well as the country's birth limits.

It also guarantees their children something many wealthy Chinese want these days: a U.S. passport.

Tony Jiang and his wife, Cherry, live in Shanghai and couldn't have children naturally. First, they turned to underground hospitals in China for surrogacy.

It didn't go well.

Jiang says one of the surrogates ran away.

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The Two-Way
2:33 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

Oso, Wash., Mudslide Death Toll Rises To 41; 4 Still Missing

Authorities announced Monday that the death toll from last month's mudslide near Oso, Wash., had risen to 41. Four people are still listed as missing.

Tuesday marks one month since the devastating landslide that caught the small community in the Cascade foothills by surprise. A rain-soaked hillside collapsed, setting in motion a massive flow of mud and debris.

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The Two-Way
1:49 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

You Can Survive A Flight In A Jet's Wheel Well, But Probably Won't

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 8:13 am

The amazing story of a 16-year-old California boy who the FBI says survived a 5 1/2-hour flight in the frigid wheel well of a jet that flew from San Jose to Hawaii on Sunday raises a logical question:

How does one survive a trip like that when the temperature would have dropped to more than 50 degrees below zero and the air would have been thinner than that at the top of Mount Everest?

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The Two-Way
1:32 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

U.N. Reports Hundreds Killed In Ethnic Violence In South Sudan

South Sudanese fleeing an attack on the town of Rank, on Saturday. The United Nations says when rebels seized the town of Bentiu, south of Rank, earlier this month, hundreds became victims of ethnically targeted killings.
Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 3:13 pm

The United Nations Mission in South Sudan says that "targeted killings of civilians" based on ethnicity were carried out in the war-torn country after rebels last week seized the city of Bentiu.

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Pop Culture
1:14 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

For Comic Hari Kondabolu, Explaining The Joke IS The Joke

Comic Hari Kondabolu's album Waiting for 2042 is a reference to the year the Census Bureau projects whites will be the minority in the U.S. "Don't worry, white people," he says. "You were a minority when you came to this country. Things seemed to have worked out for you."
Kyle Johnson

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 3:23 pm

At first, Hari Kondabolu's comedy was mostly about catharsis: "I was doing some work in detention centers and meeting families who had family members who were going to be deported," he tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "It was really powerful work ... but it was incredibly hard and performing at night was a relief. It was cathartic. It was just a way to get things out."

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Parallels
12:45 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

For Extremists In Syria, Extortion Brings Piles Of Cash From Iraq

Rebel fighters inspect the wreckage of a Syrian army helicopter after the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, or ISIS, allegedly destroyed it in March in the northern Syrian city of Aleppo.
Mohammed Al-Khatieb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 6:26 pm

The renegade Islamist group known as ISIS now controls swaths of Syria and Iraq, and it's partly because the fighters are so rich. ISIS, or the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, is known for having the biggest guns and paying the highest salaries.

While kidnapping, oil smuggling and donations from sympathizers have been well-known sources of money, the groups also run complex and brutal protection rackets, according to analysts.

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All Tech Considered
12:19 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

America's Less Religious: Study Puts Some Blame On The Internet

iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 11:03 am

America is less religious than ever before. The number of Americans who reported no religious affiliation has been growing rapidly, doubling since 1990. That kind of rapid change matches another societal trend — growth in Internet use. The percentage of Americans who say they used the Internet went from nearly zero in 1990 to 87 percent this year.

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The Two-Way
11:42 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Parents Say 234 Girls Are Missing From School In Nigeria

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 2:23 pm

Disturbing news from Nigeria about girls kidnapped last week from their school by Islamist extremists grew even more distressing on Monday when parents told authorities that 234 of the young women are still missing.

That's nearly triple the number — 85 — that officials have been reporting.

According to The Associated Press:

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