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4:02 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Russia Maintains Grip On Ukraine's Crimean Peninsula

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 12:57 pm

As Russia strengthens its military control over Crimea, what options and obligations do the U.S. and its NATO allies have to protect Ukraine? David Greene talks to retired Adm. James Stavridis.

NPR Story
4:02 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Sarah Dooley Releases Debut Album 'Stupid Things'

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 8:35 am

Dooley became a campus celebrity as an undergraduate at Columbia University. She won over Internet critics with a comedy Web series. She combines sweetness and irony in some irreverent lyrics.

Shots - Health News
2:52 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Drugmakers Slash Spending On Doctors' Sales Talks

Now that Eli Lilly & Co.'s antidepressant Cymbalta and some other blockbusters have gone generic, the company is spending less on promotional activities by doctors.
Darron Cummings AP

Originally published on Thu March 6, 2014 1:14 pm

Some of the nation's largest pharmaceutical companies have dramatically reduced payments to health professionals for promotional speeches amid heightened public scrutiny of such spending, a ProPublica analysis shows.

Eli Lilly & Co.'s payments to speakers dropped by 55 percent, from $47.9 million in 2011 to $21.6 million in 2012.

Pfizer's speaking payments fell 62 percent over the same period, from nearly $22 million to $8.3 million.

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The Salt
2:50 am
Tue March 4, 2014

In The New Globalized Diet, Wheat, Soy And Palm Oil Rule

The world is increasingly relying on a few dozen megacrops, like wheat and potatoes, for survival. Above, a wheat field in Arkansas.
Danny Johnston AP

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 8:21 am

These days you can fly to far corners of the world and eat pretty much the same food you can get back home. There's pizza in China and sushi in Ethiopia.

A new scientific study shows that something similar is true of the crops that farmers grow. Increasingly, there's a standard global diet, and the human race is depending more and more on a handful of major crops for much of its food.

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Shots - Health News
2:49 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Flagging Down Taxi Drivers To Sign Up For Obamacare

Yuvania Maldonado, a counselor for President Obama's health care law, speaks with Chicago taxi driver Mohammad Chaudri at a city office where taxi drivers go to renew their license.
M. Spencer Green AP

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 7:04 am

Dan Ware has been driving a taxicab in Chicago for more than a decade, but he still doesn't have what many jobs offer: health insurance.

"I'm without health coverage," he says.

And that's not unusual, says Chicago Public Health Commissioner Bechara Choucair. "What we know in Chicago is that around 70 percent of taxi drivers are uninsured," Choucair says.

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The Salt
2:48 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Europe Tells U.S. To Lay Off Brie And Get Its Own Cheese Names

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 8:19 am

What's in a name? It's an age-old question Juliet once asked Romeo in Shakespeare's famed play.

Today, it's a serious question between the U.S. and the European Union, which has said it wants U.S. food makers to stop using European names.

But depending on what food you're talking about, a name could be a lot, says Kyle Cherek, the producer and host of a TV show called Wisconsin Foodie.

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Shots - Health News
4:50 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

If He's Sexually Aggressive In Bars, It's Not Because He's Drunk

We used to think they behaved badly because they were drunk. Now we know they were just behaving badly.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu March 6, 2014 1:14 pm

Young women are often the targets of aggression when they're out in bars, but the problem isn't that guys are too drunk to know better.

Instead, men are preying on women who have had too much to drink.

When researchers at the University of Toronto and the University of Washington observed young people's behavior in bars, they found that the man's aggressiveness didn't match his level of intoxication. There was no relationship.

Instead, men targeted women who were intoxicated.

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The Two-Way
3:59 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

China Arrests 3 Suspects In Saturday's Deadly Knife Attack

Chinese paramilitary police stand guard outside the scene of a terrorist attack at the main train station in Kunming, Yunnan Province, Monday. Knife-wielding assailants left at least 29 people dead in the attack.
Mark Ralston AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 5:22 pm

Police in China say they have arrested some of those responsible for a massacre that took place at a train station Saturday, according to state media. The attackers used knives to kill 29 people; they injured more than four times that number.

Three suspects have been captured, reports Xinhua. The state-run agency cites a report from the Ministry of Public Security saying that with the arrests, it has now accounted for the eight people who took part in the attack.

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Politics
3:29 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

For Jim DeMint, Changing America Means Starting Small

Former Republican South Carolina Sen. Jim DeMint left his seat last year to become president of the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 8:37 pm

The Conservative Political Action Conference — better known as CPAC — kicks off its annual meeting in Washington, D.C., this week. It's a who's-who of Republican presidential contenders and marquee conservatives like Jim DeMint, a former senator from South Carolina who has played a key role in the rise of the Tea Party.

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Law
3:29 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

Yale Law Students Raise Case For Discharged Vets

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 6:19 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

In the U.S., posttraumatic stress disorder or PTSD has become part of our national vocabulary. During the Vietnam War, though, it wasn't yet a medical diagnosis, nor was it accepted as an explanation for erratic behavior. Today, a number of Vietnam veterans filed a class action lawsuit on behalf of the tens of thousands of Vietnam vets they say got kicked out of the military because of problems related to PTSD.

NPR's Quil Lawrence reports their suit aims to get these veterans the benefits they missed out on for decades.

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