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All Tech Considered
1:37 am
Tue October 15, 2013

A Company's Tweets Can Help Make It Creditworthy

Courtesy of Kabbage

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 12:25 pm

For many online and other small businesses, getting a loan or a big cash advance is tough. Banks and other traditional lenders are often leery of those without years of financial statements and solid credit scores.

But some lenders and other financial services companies are beginning to assess credit risk differently — using criteria you might not expect.

Jeffrey Grossman is an acupuncturist in Bellingham, Wash. He's also a small businessman. He creates media marketing materials for other acupuncturists hoping to expand their practice.

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Business
1:36 am
Tue October 15, 2013

JPMorgan To Front Customers If Federal Shutdown Drags On

JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon testifies before the House Financial Services Committee on June 19, 2012 in Washington, D.C.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 3:50 am

JPMorgan Chase says it will cover Social Security and Welfare payments for its customers if the government goes into default or the shutdown continues.

If nothing else, it's good public relations for a company which hasn't had much lately.

The bank spent nearly 40 percent of the company's revenue over the last quarter — more than $9 billion — on legal expenses. Money paid to fight government investigations and on fines.

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Around the Nation
5:02 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

On Montana Reservation, A Mixed Reception For Bisons' Return

A herd of 34 bison, pure of any cattle genes, have been introduced from Yellowstone National Park to the Fort Belknap Indian Reservation in northern Montana.
Dan Boyce Montana Public Radio

Originally published on Mon October 14, 2013 5:19 pm

A red pickup rolls into a 1,000-acre pasture of dry grassland on the Fort Belknap Indian Reservation in northern Montana. Mark Azure, director of the reservation's fish and wildlife department, is out looking for buffalo when he spots about two dozen of the furry beasts gathering around a watering hole.

The animals are "grazing, wallowing, drinking, checking us out," Azure explains. He says the tribes have been working to see these bison here for years.

"This is their home, this is where they came from," he says.

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The Two-Way
4:45 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

Millions Of Miles From Shutdown, Mars Rovers Keep Working

A photo composed of nearly 900 images taken by the rover Curiosity shows a section of Gale Crater near the equator of Mars. The rovers are continuing to work through the U.S. government shutdown.
NASA AP

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 12:55 pm

The budget negotiations in Washington are not front-page news on Mars. There, millions of miles away, NASA's rovers continue to operate, taking photographs and collecting data as they prepare for the coming Martian winter.

NPR's Joe Palca has this report for our Newscast unit:

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The Two-Way
4:31 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

Today Is The Last Day For The 'International Herald Tribune'

An image showing the final front page of The International Herald Tribune, published Monday Oct. 14. The newspaper will become The International New York Times Tuesday.
New York Times

Originally published on Mon October 14, 2013 11:49 pm

Monday marks the last day of newsstand sales of the International Herald Tribune, the newspaper that was once instrumental in keeping American expatriates up to date on their homeland. On Tuesday, the paper will bear a new name: The International New York Times.

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World
4:02 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

Lac-Mégantic Blast Leaves Impact On Town, Rail Industry

Crews are scrambling to clean up toxic contamination in Lac-Mégantic, Quebec, and many locals have been forced out of their homes and businesses for at least a year.
Brian Mann NCPR

Originally published on Mon October 14, 2013 5:19 pm

Three months ago, a train carrying American crude oil derailed and exploded in the heart of Lac-Mégantic, Quebec, killing 47 people.

Local leaders now say recovering from the disaster will take much more time, effort, and money than they expected.

Industry experts say the accident could change the way oil and other dangerous chemicals are transported on trains in North America.

An Empty Village

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Middle East
4:02 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

Can Iran, The West Overcome Distrust To Make A Nuclear Deal?

Originally published on Mon October 14, 2013 5:19 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Tomorrow, nuclear negotiators for Iran and six world powers will meet in Geneva. It's a chance to see whether positive signals from Iran's new president can be translated into real progress at the table. Iran wants punitive sanctions lifted, but it's insisting on its right to enrich uranium for peaceful purposes.

NPR's Peter Kenyon reports that with hardliners waiting in the wings, momentum toward an agreement needs to be generated quickly.

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Economy
4:02 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

Three Americans Win Nobel Economics Prize

Originally published on Mon October 14, 2013 5:19 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

The Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics went to three American professors today. In announcing the honor, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said the men all contribute to our understanding of how markets price things like stocks and homes. But as NPR's Dan Bobkoff reports, that doesn't mean the three economists always agree.

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Science
4:02 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

Why Is Cheating In Science Research On The Rise?

Originally published on Mon October 14, 2013 5:19 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

Cheating in science is not new, but the way it happens and the way it's detected are changing. There's a lot at stake in science research, everything from public health to valuable federal dollars.

And as Gigi Douban reports from Birmingham, Alabama, there are more people watching to keep researchers honest.

GIGI DOUBAN, BYLINE: About 60 science graduate students at the University of Alabama at Birmingham are working in small groups on a quiz.

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The Two-Way
2:39 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

Al-Qaida Suspect Captured In Libya Will Be Tried In New York

Abu Anas al-Libi, a suspected leader of al-Qaida who was seized by U.S. special forces during a raid in Libya earlier this month, is now on American soil and will face trial in New York on charges related to 1998 bombing attacks on two U.S. embassies in Africa, a U.S. official tells NPR's Carrie Johnson.

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