Amanda Vinicky

Read Amanda's "The Players" blog.

Amanda Vinicky has covered Illinois politics and government for WUIS and the Illinois Public Radio network since 2006.  Highlights include reporting on the historic impeachment and removal from office of former Gov. Rod Blagojevich, winning a national award for her coverage of Illinois' electric rate fight as a result of deregulation, and following Illinois' delegations to the Democratic and Republican national political conventions in '08 and '12.  

Though she's full-time with WUIS now, she previously interned with the station in graduate school; she graduated from the University of Illinois Springfield's Public Affairs Reporting program in '05.  She also holds degrees in journalism and political science from the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign. 

Amanda is insatiably curious, so please reach out to her and get in touch if you notice something interesting going on at the Capitol! She can be reached at (217) 206-6019 or (773) 217-0316. If she's not in the statehouse bureau, you can usually find Amanda tweeting, dining at a local restaurant, taking a jog around Springfield or Chicago or practicing yoga. 

A struggling effort to change how Illinois draws its legislative districts will live another day. State election authorities Tuesday (6/17) voted to give it some extra time to prove it deserves to make it on the November ballot.

Supporters were joyous last month when a semi-truck pulled into the state board of elections' parking lot in Springfield.

A campaign to overhaul the state's redistricting process was dropping off a 27-foot-long document, filled with a half million signatures.

  Emergency responders from Illinois and nearby states are spending this week preparing for the possibility of a natural disaster that sounds out-of-place for the Midwest ... an earthquake. 

Peoria Public Radio

  Illinois will be able to continue to expand Medicaid, thanks to a new law signed by the governor MONDAY ... even as Republicans say the state is struggling to keep pace with previous growth.  Amanda Vinicky reports.

A couple years back, a bipartisan group of state legislators worked together to scale back Medicaid -- a government-backed program that gives health care coverage to the poor and disabled. Rep. Patti Bellock, a Republican from Hinsdale, says they were tasked with finding a way to save at least $1.6 billion in order to keep it from imploding.

Illinois is poised to be one of, if not the first, states to regulate so-called "microbeads." IPR'S Amanda Vinicky.

Microbeads are tiny, think the point of a ballpoint pen. But they're causing a big fuss. Jennifer Walling, is the director of the Illinois Environmental Council.

How much you'll pay in state taxes next year remains an open question, even as the Illinois House Thursday approved dozens of spending bills, that rely on a permanently higher tax rate. It sets the stage for a budget battle, just weeks before legislators are set to adjourn for the summer.

The Illinois House convened at 8 o’clock Thursday morning, and spent most of a very long day on the budget. Lawmakers began with a debate on funding Illinois' public education system, giving schools a slight increase over this year.

Illinois' pension overhaul might be on hold, but credit ratings agencies say they're not concerned.

  One of Illinois' main tools for attracting and retaining companies in the state would get a revamp under a plan unveiled yesterday by the Speaker of the Illinois House. It drew immediate criticism from business groups.

More than 700 companies have what are known as EDGE tax credits, given in exchange for keeping, or creating new, jobs.

  Southern Illinois University Carbondale's financially-struggling student newspaper would get an infusion of cash under newly introduced legislation.

A spending measure filed in the Illinois House would give The Daily Eqyptian 70-thousand dollars.

The paper had asked for a nine-dollar-per-semester student fee, but the SIU Board of Trustees has not given approval.

The Daily Egyptian's faculty adviser, Eric Fidler says he's still hopeful that will happen this summer. But he says the 70 thousand dollars would be a buffer.

  While Illinois lawmakers continue to debate whether to extend the income tax increase. But that's not the only source of money being considered. Backers of expanding gambling also project the state would get a windfall.

State Rep. Bob Rita (D-Blue Island) is once again taking a stab at gambling expansion.

After a weekend break, legislators begin to return to Springfield Monday as the calendar draws closer to the scheduled May 31st adjournment. IPR'S Amanda Vinicky catches us up.

While the end of the month is a key date, it's another one, about a half a year away, that will largely guide much of what happens these next few weeks: the election.

The Republican nominee for governor says he wants to roll back Illinois' income tax hike. But he has yet to say much else about how he would handle the resulting budget deficit. IPR'S Amanda Vinicky reports.

Illinois' temporary income tax hike would become permanent if Democratic Governor Pat Quinn has his way.

A court is being asked to prevent any aspect of Illinois' pension overhaul from taking effect, until it's decided whether the law is constitutional. A motion was filed Friday in Sangamon County Court.

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