Merrit Kennedy

A North Carolina man who fired an AR-15 rifle inside a pizza restaurant in Washington, D.C., last year as he was "investigating" a baseless conspiracy theory has been sentenced to four years in prison.

Edgar Maddison Welch pleaded guilty in March to federal charges of assault with a dangerous weapon and transporting a firearm over state lines. The case is seen as a clear example of the potential real-world consequences of fake news stories.

Updated at 5:54 p.m. ET

A jury has found a former Milwaukee police officer not guilty of first-degree reckless homicide in the shooting death of Sylville Smith, a 23-year-old black man, last August.

"Cries of outrage" erupted in the courtroom after the verdict was announced, member station WUWM reported.

The Department of Defense procured uniforms for the Afghan Army in a camouflage pattern that is both far more expensive than other options and likely inappropriate for the landscape there, a U.S. government watchdog says.

The pattern choice cost U.S. taxpayers as much as $28.2 million extra since 2008, according to a report out Wednesday, and if changed could save up to $72.21 million over the next 10 years.

A top FBI official says that the man who opened fire at a Republican baseball practice a week ago didn't appear to be targeting a specific individual and that the attack appears to have been spontaneous.

James T. Hodgkinson was killed by police after he fired more than 60 shots at GOP congressmen, staffers and police at a baseball field in Alexandria, Va., last Wednesday. House Majority Whip Steve Scalise was hit by gunfire in the attack, along with three other victims.

More than 3,000 people have been killed in a remote region in the Democratic Republic of Congo, according to a new report from Congo's Catholic Church.

As NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton reports, the violence in the central Kasai region erupted last August, "when the military killed Kamuina Nsapu, a chief who was calling for government forces to leave the region." The Church has been trying to broker a peace deal. Here's more from Ofeibea:

Argentine police have uncovered some 75 Nazi artifacts hidden in a secret room in a house near Buenos Aires. The objects include children's harmonicas in a box adorned with swastikas and a large bust relief of Adolf Hitler.

Argentina's Ministry of Security stated that the pieces were all "of illegal origin and of great interest due to their historical value." The finding came after a federal police investigation.

The Supreme Court has ruled that six men detained after the September 11 attacks are not legally able to sue top officials from the Bush administration.

The men, who are of Arab or South Asian descent and in the U.S. illegally, were detained with hundreds of others and held for periods of between three and six months at a federal facility in Brooklyn, according to the opinion. Five are Muslim.

Otto Warmbier, a U.S. citizen who was freed last week after more than a year in North Korean detention, has died. Doctors who examined him after his return to said he had "extensive loss of tissue" in all parts of his brain.

Warmbier, 22, had been in a coma since coming home to the United States last week.

The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to take up an appeal over electoral districts in Wisconsin after a lower court ruled that the state's Republican-drawn map constitutes an "unconstitutional partisan gerrymander."

It's the first time in more than a decade that the nation's highest court will take up the issue of partisan gerrymandering, or drawing voting districts with the aim of strengthening one political party.

British authorities are launching a criminal investigation into the London apartment building fire — as the death toll from the blaze has nearly doubled, to 30.

The death toll is expected to rise further as rescue workers continue to search for victims – an operation that Metropolitan Police Commander Stuart Cundy described as "extremely challenging."

Updated 2:15 a.m. ET Saturday

Hundreds of people gathered in St. Paul, Minn., Friday evening to protest a verdict that found a Minnesota police officer not guilty on all counts in his deadly shooting of a black man during a traffic stop in 2016.

Demonstrators gathered at the Minnesota State Capitol holding signs that included the phrases "black lives matter," and "no justice, no peace," and hundreds marched toward the nearby Cathedral of Saint Paul.

An advertising blimp fell from the sky on Thursday and crashed near the scene of golf's U.S. Open in Wisconsin, injuring the pilot.

The Washington County Sheriff's Office described the pilot's injuries as "serious." It said in a statement that the pilot was the only person on board.

"The initial investigation reveals the blimp may have experienced mechanical problems prior to the crash," the sheriff's office added.

Video of Turkish security personnel appearing to punch, kick and club demonstrators in Washington, D.C., went viral and sparked outrage last month.

Now, the Metropolitan Police Department has announced that 18 people are facing charges in connection to the incident outside the Turkish ambassador's residence during a visit by Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

A federal judge in Washington, D.C., ruled Wednesday that the Trump administration failed to follow proper environmental procedures when it granted approval to the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline project.

It's a legal victory for the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and environmentalists, who protested for months against the pipeline. Oil started flowing through it earlier this month. The tribe fears that the pipeline, which crosses the Missouri River just upstream of its reservation, could contaminate its drinking water and sacred lands.

The gray seal population in New England has bounced back, and new data points to how well seal numbers are doing.

Gray seal numbers had been decimated for more than a century when the Marine Mammal Protection Act was passed in 1972. The animals were hunted in New England, and as NPR has reported, Massachusetts even paid a bounty of $5 each.

Though it has been clear that the population has grown in number, it has been difficult to pinpoint just how much.

The Australian government has agreed to a $53 million settlement with 1,905 people who were held at a refugee detention camp on Manus Island, Papua New Guinea.

It's one of the largest human rights class-action settlements in Australian history.

The Manus Island camp, an all-male facility, has for years been blasted by rights groups for its conditions. The detainees party to the lawsuit were held there at various times between November 2012 and May 2016, and say they suffered from negligence and false imprisonment.

Panama has announced that it is cutting ties with Taiwan and instead establishing relations with China. The shift is a major win for China as it seeks to isolate Taiwan, which now has diplomatic relations with just 20 countries.

In Pakistan, a court in Punjab province has sentenced a 30-year-old man to death over posting allegedly blasphemous content on social media.

Prosecutor Shafiq Qureshi confirmed the sentence against Taimoor Raza, according to The Associated Press and Reuters. It's the country's "harshest handed down yet for a cyber-crime related offence," according to Amnesty International.

Montana representative-elect Greg Gianforte pleaded guilty Monday to a charge of misdemeanor assault after body-slamming a reporter from The Guardian on the eve of Gianforte's election to the U.S. House.

He received a six-month deferred sentence and will serve no jail time.

Guardian reporter Ben Jacobs was asking Gianforte a question on May 24 when the Republican candidate threw him to the ground.

Bald eagles and red-tailed hawks are not typically friends — in fact, they have been known to fight each other to the death.

That's why Canadian bird watchers were so surprised when they spotted a pair of bald eagles sharing a nest with and caring for a baby red-tailed hawk, in addition to their own three eaglets.

The Saudi Arabian Football Federation issued an apology after its national team provoked outrage in Australia by not formally participating in a moment of silence for London rampage victims.

Updated at 8:15 p.m. ET

Reality Winner, a 25-year-old National Security Agency contractor accused of leaking classified information to a news outlet, has pleaded not guilty at a hearing in Augusta, Ga. The judge denied her bail after prosecutors suggested she may possess more secret documents.

Amnesty International says that shortly after sunrise on Tuesday, security forces turned up at the home of its Turkey country chairman, brought him to his office, then took him into custody.

Hawaii's governor has signed a bill that adopts goals of the Paris climate agreement, despite President Trump's announcement last week that the U.S. is pulling out of the global accord.

"Reducing greenhouse emissions in Hawaii is now the law — the state law," reports Hawaii Public Radio's Bill Dorman. "While the specifics are a bit vague, the political message is clear: to keep pace with environmental commitments made as part of the Paris accord."

The Trump administration is warning that the U.S. might leave the U.N. Human Rights Council, arguing that it displays anti-Israel bias and ignores violations by certain countries.

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley said in a speech to the council Tuesday that the United States is "looking carefully at this council and our participation in it. We see some areas for significant strengthening."

British police have identified 22-year-old Youssef Zaghba, an Italian of Moroccan descent, as the third attacker in Saturday's violent rampage in London that killed at least seven people.

The announcement came a day after London's Metropolitan Police Service named two other men as attackers: 27-year-old Khuram Sharzad Butt, a British citizen born in Pakistan, and 30-year-old Rachid Redouane, who "claimed to be Moroccan and Libyan."

Zaghba "was not a police or MI5 subject of interest," according to the Metropolitan Police. Like Butt and Redouane, he lived in east London.

U.S.-backed fighters have launched an operation to try to seize control of ISIS' so-called capital, the city of Raqqa in northern Syria.

Raqqa is the most important stronghold for the militant group in Syria and fell under its control in 2014. Together with the ongoing fight for Mosul in Iraq, seizing control of the city is seen as a crucial goal in the fight against ISIS.

The Trump administration is taking steps to allow five energy companies to use seismic air guns for oil and gas exploration off the U.S. Atlantic coast even though they would incidentally harass marine mammals. Environmental groups and some coastal communities object.

"The testing would take place over a huge area ranging from the Delaware Bay, south to Cape Canaveral in Florida," NPR's Jeff Brady reports. "Ships would crisscross the ocean shooting loud bursts of sound underwater to map the geology."

Updated at 6:30 p.m. ET

London Metropolitan Police have identified two of the three attackers involved in Saturday's violent rampage on and around London Bridge, releasing photos of Khuram Shazad Butt and Rachid Redouane and asking the public for help in tracing their movements.

Police shot and killed the three attackers within eight minutes of the initial emergency call about the attack that killed at least seven people. Detectives are still working to identify the third attacker.

Crude oil is now flowing through the Dakota Access Pipeline, despite months of protests against it by Native American tribes and environmental groups.

The pipeline spans more than 1,000 miles from North Dakota to Illinois and cost some $3.8 billion to construct. It is expected to transport approximately 520,000 barrels of oil daily.

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