Rachel Lippmann

Lippmann returned to her native St. Louis after spending two years covering state government in Lansing, Michigan. She earned her undergraduate degree from Northwestern University and followed (though not directly) in Maria Altman's footsteps in Springfield, also earning her graduate degree in public affairs reporting. She's also done reporting stints in Detroit, Michigan and Austin, Texas. Rachel likes to fill her free time with good books, good friends, good food, and good baseball.

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Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

A working group studying how to improve municipal courts in St. Louis is specifically recommending that the state Supreme Court force those courts to consolidate.

It was one of several recommendations finalized Tuesday by the Ferguson Commission's working group on municipal courts and governance. Members of the group considered consolidation at the request of Rich McClure, a co-chair of the Ferguson Commission.

(Updated 2:00 p.m. Wednesday with further statements from the St. Louis Cardinals.)

In a statement released Wednesday, Cardinals general manager John Mozeliak and team chairman Bill DeWitt Jr. strongly condemned the alleged hacking.

"These are serious allegations that don’t reflect who we are as an organization,” DeWitt said.   "We are committed to getting to the bottom of this matter as soon as possible, and if anyone within our organization is determined to be involved in anything inappropriate, they will be held accountable."

The Ferguson Commission agreed Monday night by a unanimous vote to adopt a new operating principle that requires its working groups to use a lens of racial equality as they consider their recommendations for the September report. 

Updated as of 10:30 pm., April 22, 2015:

The family of Michael Brown will file a wrongful death lawsuit against the City of Ferguson on Thursday, according to a news  release sent Wednesday night.

The appeals court judge now hearing municipal cases in Ferguson has limited the amount of fines and fees the city can collect from defendants facing traffic, animal control or housing ordinance violations.

For the latest updates on this developing story, see our live blog.

Two St. Louis-area police officers monitoring protesters at the Ferguson police department were shot shortly after midnight. While the injuries were termed serious, both officers were released from the hospital later in the morning.

Looking toward Thursday night, when at least one group has called for a candlelight vigil at the department, law enforcement officials announced that the County Police Department and the Missouri Highway Patrol would take over security around the headquarters on South Florissant Road.

Ronald Brockmeyer, the municipal judge in Ferguson, has resigned less than a week after a scathing federal report called his court little more than an ATM for the city. And the Missouri Supreme Court has ordered all Ferguson municipal court cases transferred to Judge Roy L. Richter of the Court of Appeals for the Eastern District of Missouri.

Former Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson will not face criminal charges for shooting and killing Mike Brown in August, but he may still end up in a courtroom over the incident.  

After St. Louis County Prosecutor Bob McCulloch announced Monday that a grand jury had decided not to charge Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson with a crime in the August death of Michael Brown, he carried out his promise to release thousands of pages of grand jury testimony and evidence.  

Within minutes after St. Louis County Prosecutor Robert McCulloch announced that the grand jury did not recommend that Darren Wilson face indictment for the shooting death of Michael Brown, reactions from area politicians came quickly. 

Before and after the grand jury’s decision was made public, area officials made clear Monday night that they understood the stakes.

A grand jury in St. Louis County has decided not to charge Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson with a crime for the Aug. 9 death of Michael Brown, an unarmed, 18-year-old black man.

The sound of honking horns became a symbol Thursday night along West Florissant Avenue in Ferguson.

It was the first night since Saturday -- the day Michael Brown was shot to death by a Ferguson police officer -- that traffic had been allowed to move freely along one of the main commercial strips in Ferguson. There was no line of police in riot gear and armored vehicles facing off against a crowd. The few officers spotted were in regular uniforms. The atmosphere felt more like a party than a protest.

Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio

Activists who work in north St. Louis County used the fourth day of protests over the shooting of an unarmed teenager to try and channel some of the anger into productive conversations. 

Updated at 7 a.m. Monday
 
The situation in Ferguson has settled down following a night of destruction.
 
There is no more systematic looting, but small groups are still casing stores, according to St.