Sean Crawford

Chatham

Advisory Board Ex-Officio

217-206-6408

Sean has led WUIS' news operations since the fall of 2009. He replaced the only other person to do so in the station's history, Rich Bradley. Prior to taking over the News Department, Sean worked as Statehouse Bureau Chief for WUIS and other Illinois Public Radio stations. He spent more than a dozen years on the capitol beat.

Sean  began his broadcasting career at his hometown station in Herrin, Illinois while still in high school.  It was there he learned to cover local government, courts and anything else that made the news.  He spent time in the Joliet area as News Director and Operations Manager for a radio station and worked for a chain of weekly newspapers for two years.  Along with news coverage, he reported heavily on sports and did on-air play by play. 

Sean holds a Master's Degree in Public Affairs Reporting from the University of Illinois Springfield. 

High school basketball in Illinois has always been a popular spectator sport.  But you might not know that from the recent state tournaments.  

State Week: Budget Battles Continue In Courts

Mar 27, 2017

It seems there more budget action in Illinois courts than in the Statehouse. After getting just one paycheck since last summer, state legislators are finally getting paid.

Republican senators working with Gov. Bruce Rauner began breaking off pieces of the "grand bargain," which Democrats say undermines efforts to move toward a compromise budget. Meanwhile, what had been a bipartisan selection process for Illinois' U.S. attorneys is changing, with senior Republican Congressman John Shimkus saying he's waiting for the Trump administration to advise him on how to proceed.

As Illinois remains mired in gridlock and nearing two years without a full budget, voters are pinning the blame on state leaders.

There have been numerous rallies since the election in November.  Most have been protests of the new administration.  Saturday in Springfield, a March 4 Trump event will bring together supporters of the new president.  

Members of AFSCME voted overwhelmingly to give the union's bargaining committee the power to strike. The union has been in a contract fight with Gov. Bruce Rauner for more than two years. Rauner has tried to impose his terms, saying they're a fair deal for both workers and taxpayers. Meanwhile, in the week following the governor's budget address, Rauner did little to support or defend his plan.

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Fans of the St. Louis Cardinals and Chicago Cubs don't always see eye to eye.  But they can agree the rivalry is one of the best in sports. Illinois Public Radio’s Sean Crawford tells us it will be on display in Springfield.

The Cubs versus Cardinals Rivalry exhibit will start March 24 at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum in Springfield.  It will run throughout the year.

Gov. Bruce Rauner issued his third budget proposal to the General Assembly this week (potential deficit: $7.2 billion). Meanwhile, a St. Clair County judge declined to rescind his order paying state employees even without the legislative authorization required in the Illinois Constitution (cost so far: $3 billion). That, a remembrance of the late Peoria Congressman Bob Michel, and more.

Governor Bruce Rauner delivered his 2017 Budget Address to a joint session of the Illinois General Assembly Wednesday.  

 


Steven Depolo / Flickr

It's tax time.  Filing can be a daunting chore.  While tax software has made it easier, mistakes still occur. Linda Forman, an Evanston CPA, talked with Illinois Public Radio's Sean Crawford about some things to watch out for when preparing taxes this year. 

President Trump’s decision to fire Acting Attorney General Sally Yates has also elevated a central Illinois native to the top law enforcement position. 

This week, more talk of a potential bipartisan compromise on reaching a budget agreement - in the Senate, at least.  Governor Bruce Rauner isn't commenting on it, however.  Matt Dietrich of Reboot Illinois and Tony Arnold of WBEZ Public Radio join the panel.

Copyright 2017 WUIS-FM. To see more, visit WUIS-FM.

Facebook/Women's March on Washington - Tucson March

Along with the presidential inauguration, another big event is planned in Washington this week. It's called the Women's March and Illinois will be represented.  The rally is set for Saturday, the day after Donald Trump is sworn in as president.  

Illinois legislators are returning to Springfield for the final few days of lame duck session. Will there be a grand compromise? And what's the deal with the Illinois Republican Party's interference in the Democratic race for speaker of the House?

While Hillary Clinton won the presidential race in the State of Illinois, a lot of voters chose "none of the above."  

Illinois' stopgap spending plan expires December 31st and there is still no sign of a budget agreement.  State workers continue to be paid, but social service agencies, colleges, and universities are bracing for a chilly new year.

Bernie Schoenburg of The State Journal-Register  joins the panel.

There seems to be no shortage of names being floated as possible Democratic contenders for governor in 2018.  One of the wealthiest men in America is among them.  

As Gov. Bruce Rauner continues attacking Democrats, it's looking increasingly likely that Illinois will enter 2017 without a budget. Meanwhile, former Congressman Aaron Schock pleaded not guilty to federal corruption charges.

Nuclear plant workers in Clinton and Quad Cities — not to mention Exelon and ComEd shareholders — got a helping hand from Gov. Bruce Rauner and the Illinois General Assembly. But there was no such luck for the many social service providers, university students and countless others hoping for Illinois' first full budget in a year-and-a-half.

Exelon says without a special deal from Illinois lawmakers, the company will close nuclear plants in Clinton and the Quad Cities. And with just one more week of veto session, what are the prospects for a full budget deal before the end of the year — or 2019?

Teenagers are texting while behind the wheel, despite the law prohibiting it.  And that's not all they're doing. 

Hillary Clinton won big in Illinois last night, along with Tammy Duckworth in her race for the U.S. Senate. 


But Sangamon County voters showed their preference for Republicans.  


Illinois is one of the states considered most at risk for a major earthquake.  This week, officials are trying to get people thinking safety.  

The Simon Poll says incumbent Sen. Mark Kirk is 14 points behind Congresswoman Tammy Duckworth. Democrats and Republicans are trying to use the other side's unpopular leaders to sink down-ballot candidates. Plus, Illinois is awash in campaign cash.

A federal judge has put limits on election-day voter registration in the most populous parts of Illinois. The governor's office has a rosier view of the Illinois deficit then legislative analysts. And Donald Trump once again shines a light on violence and policing in Chicago.

In a small pond in Wisconsin,  a recent study took place that could have some big implications when it comes to the spread of Asian Carp.  
 
The invasive species threatens to take over waterways, like the Great Lakes. It's already become a major problem in the Illinois and Mississippi Rivers and elsewhere.  

Gov. Bruce Rauner has donated $16 million of his fortune to help elect Republican candidates. But he also says he's not really involved in the election. Huh?

This week, discussion of a recent ruling on negotiations between AFSCME and Governor Rauner.  Also, enrollment numbers released for the state's public universities, and reflecting on the death of Phyllis Schlafly.  Illinois Issues' Jamey Dunn and Ivan Moreno of the Associated Press join the panel.

It's a story of accomplishment and the ability to overcome challenges.  

"All The Difference" chronicles the lives of two African-American males from the south side of Chicago, Robert Henderson and Krishaun Branch. They grew up amid violence and poverty.  Yet, their bleak surroundings didn't stop their ambition to be the first in their families to attend and graduate from college.  

Gage Skidmore / WUIS

The outspoken conservative activist Phyllis Schlafly has passed away.  She was 92 and died at her home in St Louis Monday. Schlafly was a vocal leader on the far right for decades.  In the 1970's,  she led a fight against the Equal Rights Amendment.  A lot of that centered on Illinois and played out at the statehouse.  Taylor Pensoneau had a front row seat as a state government reporter. 

 

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