Véronique LaCapra

Science reporter Véronique LaCapra first caught the radio bug writing commentaries for NPR affiliate WAMU in Washington, D.C. After producing her first audio documentaries at the Duke Center for Documentary Studies in N.C., she was hooked! She has done ecological research in the Brazilian Pantanal; regulated pesticides for the Environmental Protection Agency in Arlington, Va.; been a freelance writer and volunteer in South Africa; and contributed radio features to the Voice of America in Washington, D.C. She earned a Ph.D. in ecosystem ecology from the University of California in Santa Barbara, and a B.A. in environmental policy and biology from Cornell. LaCapra grew up in Cambridge, Mass., and in her mother’s home town of Auxerre, France.

State News
2:38 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

Forty-Five Years Ago, We First Landed On The Moon: Meet The Man In Charge In Mission Control

NASA flight director Eugene F. Kranz at his console in Mission Control in Houston on May 30, 1965, during a Gemini-Titan IV simulation to prepare for the four-day, 62-orbit flight.

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 5:17 pm

Forty-five years ago this Sunday, Apollo 11 became the first space flight to land men on the moon.

At Mission Control in Houston, Gene Kranz was the man in charge.

Kranz spent more than three decades working for the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration, serving as flight director for both the Gemini and Apollo space programs.

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State News
6:44 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Saving The Monarch's Migration: A Conversation With Ecologist Lincoln Brower

Monarch butterflies cluster on the branch of an oyamel fir tree in Mexico.

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 3:15 pm

Every year, monarch butterflies undertake what seems like an impossible journey.

By the millions, they leave their summer breeding grounds in the United States and Canada to fly thousands of miles to a small area of alpine forest in central Mexico.

Ecologist Lincoln Brower has been studying monarchs for almost 60 years.

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