Morning Edition

Renee Montaigne & Steve Inskeep

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.

The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers.  In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens.  

Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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Business
2:46 am
Thu September 12, 2013

5 Years After Financial Crisis, Are Big Banks Still A Threat?

The headquarters of Lehman Brothers in Times Square in 2008, the year the financial services firm filed for bankruptcy.
Hiroko Masuike Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 10:30 am

It's been five years since Lehman Brothers collapsed and touched off a banking crisis that is still being felt by the global economy. Today, the banking industry is a lot stronger than it was, but some critics say efforts to reform banking regulations have fallen short of their potential.

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Shots - Health News
2:45 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Why Painting Tumors Could Make Brain Surgeons Better

Physician Jim Olson cares for children with brain cancer in Seattle. His laboratory studies the gene expression programs controlling neural differentiation, brain tumor genesis and neurodegenerative diseases.
Courtesy of Susie Fitzhugh/Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 5:58 am

Perhaps one of the most uncomfortable things a doctor has to tell patients is that their medical problems are iatrogenic. What that means is they were caused by a doctor in the course of the treatment.

Sometime these iatrogenic injuries are accidental. But sometimes, because of the limits of medical technology, they can be inevitable. Now, a medical researcher in Seattle thinks he has a way to eliminate some of the inevitable ones.

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Author Interviews
2:43 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Tired Of Inequality? One Economist Says It'll Only Get Worse

Economist Tyler Cowen believes that income inequality in America is only increasing. His new book is called Average Is Over: Powering America Beyond the Age of the Great Stagnation.
Szasz-Fabian Ilka Erika iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 8:57 am

Economist Tyler Cowen has some advice for what to do about America's income inequality: Get used to it. In his latest book, Average Is Over, Cowen lays out his prediction for where the U.S. economy is heading, like it or not:

"I think we'll see a thinning out of the middle class," he tells NPR's Steve Inskeep. "We'll see a lot of individuals rising up to much greater wealth. And we'll also see more individuals clustering in a kind of lower-middle class existence."

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Code Switch
1:58 am
Thu September 12, 2013

For Native Americans, Mental Health Budget Cuts Hit Hard

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 8:49 am

Native American tribes gave up millions of acres to the federal government in the 19th century in exchange for promises of funded health care, education and housing. But time and again, those funds have been cut.

The recent across-the-board federal budget cuts, known as sequestration, are no exception. They came with a 5 percent reduction in funding for mental health services, including suicide prevention. That's especially troubling for Native Americans, whose suicide rate are four times the national average.

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Media
12:36 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Tina Brown To Leave The Daily Beast

The Daily Beast editor-in-chief Tina Brown plans to leave the website to produce live forums on news topics.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 8:41 am

Celebrity editor Tina Brown announced Wednesday that she's leaving The Daily Beast to launch her own media company. She has been a regular guest on Morning Edition. Brown, 59, plans to produce live forums on news topics.

Brown has edited some of the most prestigious publications: Vanity Fair, The New Yorker and Tattler. Five years ago, she helped found The Daily Beast — a news and opinion website. Now, the editor-in-chief says she's leaving to do what she calls "theatrical journalism" before live audiences.

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Politics
6:54 am
Wed September 11, 2013

U.S. Fleshes Out Russian Plan For Syria's Chemical Weapons

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

President Obama last night urged a strike on Syria that he is not yet ready to order and that the country seems unready to accept.

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Europe
6:14 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Authorities Discover Vodka Vending Machine

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 6:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. We've told you about baguettes in France offered in vending machines and bars of gold in Abu Dhabi. Now we can report on a vending machine selling vodka in Ukraine. For a dollar, patrons could enjoy a shot in the town center of Melitopol, mixers also available - until the machine was discovered by authorities. Unlawfully produced vodka is widespread in Ukraine and the vodka vending machine - a converted coffee maker. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
5:43 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Cave Explorers Find Wallet Lost 17 Years Ago

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 6:54 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Seventeen years ago, Joseph Sweet and a friend went into a cave in Watertown, New York and got lost inside. They grew so desperate for light that Mr. Sweet made little torches out of the only fuel he had, taking dollar bills from his wallet and setting them on fire. On top of everything else, he lost the wallet. He was finally rescued. And now, 17 years later, different cave explorers found the wallet, still with ID, and returned it.

National Security
3:26 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Tech Visionary Focuses Now On Biological Weapons Threat

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 3:54 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Next, we'll introduce you to Nathan Myhrvold, who made his name as a prolific inventor at Microsoft. These days, he's focusing on a different kind of technological advance - the threat from biological weapons. Myhrvold is in Washington this week to meet with national security leaders, and try to convince them to spend time and energy on potential attacks. NPR's Carrie Johnson reports.

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National Security
3:26 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Documents Show NSA Violated Court Restrictions

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 6:54 am

The National Security Agency violated special court restrictions on the use of a database of telephone calls, but the NSA says it fixed those problems. That's the bottom line from more documents declassified by the director of National Intelligence. The document dump is part of an effort to share more details about NSA surveillance activities that were uncovered by former government contractor Edward Snowden.

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