Morning Edition

Renee Montaigne & Steve Inskeep

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.

The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers.  In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens.  

Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

Composer ID: 
5187efd5e1c8f0f7bd9e7d5d|5187efd1e1c8f0f7bd9e7d56

Pages

Shots - Health News
1:19 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Obama Administration Seeks To Ease Approvals For Antibiotics

These staph bacteria are resistant to vancomycin, an antibiotic that is one of the last lines of defense.
Janice Haney Carr CDC

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 4:15 pm

Every day in hospitals all over America, thousands of patients die of infections that used to be curable. But the antibiotics used to treat them aren't working anymore.

It's called drug resistance, and it's largely a consequence of antibiotics overuse. The more germs are exposed to antibiotics, the faster they mutate to evade being vanquished.

Read more
Code Switch
11:03 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

New Survey Takes A Snapshot Of The View From Black America

African-Americans said they were optimistic about the future despite anxieties about possible financial hardships.
Barry Gregg Corbis

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 4:19 pm

You might think African-Americans might be more pessimistic about their lives. The housing crisis decimated pockets of black wealth. The black unemployment rate has been nearly double the national average for several years.

But according to findings from our survey of more than 1,000 African-Americans, you'd be wrong.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:41 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

Why Chase Tornadoes? To Save Lives, Not To 'Die Ourselves'

Friday's storm, which produced a mile-wide tornado, as it neared El Reno, Okla.
Richard Rowe Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 7:10 am

  • Josh Wurman on why scientists get close to tornadoes
  • Josh Wurman on how the community is reacting to three storm chasers' deaths

The deaths Friday of veteran storm chaser Tim Samaras, his son Paul and their friend Carl Young when a tornado near El Reno, Okla., pummeled their vehicle has raised some questions:

-- Why do storm chasers do what they do?

-- Do the benefits outweigh the dangers?

Read more
Strange News
9:23 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Scottish Couple Welcomes Third Set Of Twins

Karen and Colin Rodger already had two sets of boys. When Mom got pregnant this time, the thought of more twins crossed her mind, but a doctor said the odds were 500,000 to 1. Now she's given birth to twin girls, and the family tells the Daily Mirror it's shopping for a van.

Around the Nation
6:49 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Wisconsin Hopes Cream Puff Controversy Won't Curdle Fair

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 5:51 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Around the Nation
6:37 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Yankees Pay Tribute To 'Lifelong' Fan

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 9:23 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

Yankees fan Bernando LaPallo was born the same year as his team. And Saturday, more than a century after attending his first game, LaPallo was at the New Yankee Stadium for what he called: the greatest day of my life. He shook hands with shortstop Derek Jeter. But 93 years earlier, LaPallo shook hands with Babe Ruth who called him my youngest admirer. LaPallo is now 111 years old.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Author Interviews
5:07 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Sushi Chef Was Confidant To North Korea's Kim Jong Il

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 12:36 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

When the North Korean dictator Kim Jong Il died two years ago, his son Kim Jong Un rose to power. The world knew practically nothing about the young and untested leader. In fact, nobody knew exactly how young he was until his birth date was revealed by a man who goes by the pseudonym Kenji Fujimoto, Kim Jong Il's former sushi chef and longtime confidante.

Read more
Business
4:54 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Trial To Start In Apple Price-Fixing Dispute

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 9:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And Apple faces off with the Justice Department beginning today in a federal court over a price-fixing dispute. Last year, the government accused Apple of conspiring with five major publishing companies to raise prices on electronic books.

NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

Read more
Middle East
4:54 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Fight For Homs Fades From Headlines As War In Syria Rages

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 9:23 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. We're going to get a glimpse from the front lines of the civil war in Syria now. That war is expected to be the focus of peace negotiations, in the coming weeks. The U.S. is pressing for those talks after brutal fighting, fighting that's begun to spread to neighboring countries.

Read more
Code Switch
2:36 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Barrier-Breaking Surfer's Legacy A Reminder Of Work To Do

Surfers surround a celebrant who pours libations and says prayers to honor the spirit of surfers past and present and to give thanks to the sea for providing sustenance and recreation.
Karen Grigsby Bates NPR

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 2:31 pm

The Saturday morning fog was burning off above the part of Santa Monica's beach known as the Inkwell. It's the stretch of sand to which black Southern Californians were relegated by de facto segregation until the 1960s.

Men, women and children walked across the sand in wet suits, carrying surfboards. They're part of the Black Surfers Collective, which aims to get more people of color involved in surfing.

They had gathered to honor pioneer Nick Gabaldon, a legendary surfer who is remembered as the area's first documented board man of African-American and Mexican heritage.

Read more

Pages