Morning Edition

Renee Montaigne & Steve Inskeep

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.

The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers.  In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens.  

Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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It's All Politics
2:26 am
Wed April 24, 2013

People On Terror Watch List Not Blocked From Buying Guns

Assault weapons and hand guns for sale.
Seth Perlman AP

Originally published on Wed April 24, 2013 7:49 am

Even al-Qaida gloats about what's possible under U.S. gun laws. In June 2011, a senior al-Qaida operative, Adam Gadahn, released a video message rallying people to take advantage of opportunities those laws provide.

"America is absolutely awash with easily obtainable firearms," Gadahn says, explaining that "you can go down to a gun show at the local convention center" and buy a gun without a background check.

Then a faint smile crosses Gadahn's face. "So what are you waiting for?" he asks.

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The Salt
2:25 am
Wed April 24, 2013

For Corn, Fickle Weather Makes For Uncertain Yields

By this time last year, 26 percent of the country's corn crop was already planted. A wet, cold spring means that only 4 percent is in the ground right now.
Seth Perlman AP

Originally published on Wed April 24, 2013 8:06 am

Last year's drought wreaked havoc on farmers' fields in much of the Midwest, cutting crop yields and forcing livestock producers to cull their herds. This spring, the rain that farmers needed so badly in 2012 has finally returned. But maybe too much, and at the wrong time.

It's almost the end of April, which is prime time to plant corn. But farmers need a break in the rain so they can get this year's crops in the ground and try to lock in good yields at harvest.

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The Salt
2:24 am
Wed April 24, 2013

How Coffee Influenced The Course Of History

An overseer sits in the shade while workers collect coffee beans on a Brazilian plantation, circa 1750.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 2:49 pm

Coffee is a powerful beverage. On a personal level, it helps keep us awake and active. On a much broader level, it has helped shape our history and continues to shape our culture.

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Around the Nation
7:41 am
Tue April 23, 2013

Shot Putter Donates Bone Marow To A Stranger

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 2:05 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Around the Nation
7:22 am
Tue April 23, 2013

Whimsical Idea Expands To Chinese Food Mission

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 2:05 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

It was just a whimsical idea back in the '70s. David Chan and his co-workers decided to try every Chinese restaurant in the neighborhood. Now, the 64-year-old Los Angeles attorney has visited more than 6,000 Chinese eateries around the world. The L.A. Times says he once hit 300 restaurants in a single year. You'll find Chan using a fork. He's not a chopsticks guy.

He often gives advice to restaurant critics. Chan says he's always just been a collector - stamps, records - now dumplings.

NPR Story
4:19 am
Tue April 23, 2013

Mississippi River Communities Brace For Flooding

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 2:05 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now here's a change. Earlier this year, the worst drought conditions seen in the Midwest in decades threatened to close the Mississippi River to barge traffic. Now, communities along the river in Missouri and Illinois are bracing for flooding.

St. Louis Public Radio Maria Altman reports.

MARIA ALTMAN, BYLINE: The threat of flooding on the Mississippi River came on quickly after last week's storms dumped rain across the Midwest. The town of Clarksville, Missouri didn't even have time to erect its metal flood wall.

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NPR Story
4:19 am
Tue April 23, 2013

Deciphering Foreign Versus Domestic Terrorism

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 5:53 am

Steve Inskeep talks with Karen Greenberg, Director of Fordham University's Center on National Security, about defining terrorism, what it means to call an act domestic versus international terrorism and the political ramifications.

NPR Story
4:19 am
Tue April 23, 2013

Boston Case Casts Shadow Over Capitol Hill Immigration Hearing

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 4:46 am

The Senate Judiciary Committee turned its attention back to the immigration overhaul proposal Monday, even as opponents began to use the Boston bombers' journey to the United States as a cautionary tale.

The Salt
2:47 am
Tue April 23, 2013

Newspaper Takes The Pulse Of San Diego Coffee Culture

John Rippo in July 2012 in a coffeehouse called Espresso Mio, in San Diego's Mission Hills neighborhood.
Courtesy of Josh Bletchely

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 2:51 pm

Portland and Seattle may take coffee very seriously, but San Diego can boast a newspaper devoted entirely to coffee shops and all the news that's fit to print about them. John Rippo is the publisher of The Espresso, and he's convinced that coffee shops are the places to catch juicy moments of the human experience as they happen.

Inspired by European periodicals written for the cafe intelligentsia, Rippo curates local news in his monthly paper to inspire his fellow San Diego residents to social or political action.

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Author Interviews
2:46 am
Tue April 23, 2013

For TV Networks, Stiff Competition To Be 'Top Of The Morning'

Grafissimo iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 2:05 pm

Last spring, what NBC fondly refers to as "America's First Family" went through a very public divorce. Ann Curry, who spent more than a decade as a news anchor on the Today show and less than a year as a host, was unexpectedly axed. "For all of you who saw me as a groundbreaker," Curry said with emotion in her last morning broadcast, "I'm sorry I couldn't carry the ball over the finish line. But man, I did try."

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