5% income tax rate

Keenan Chan / WILL/Illinois Public Radio

Before State Senator Mike Frerichs is sworn in as Illinois' treasurer next month, he's got a few more votes to cast as a legislator.

Quinn and Rauner face off in final debate

Oct 21, 2014

The debate portion of the Illinois governor’s race is over. The last debate gives voters a little clarity.

The credit rating agency Moody's is criticizing the Illinois state budget passed last week. As IPR's Brian Mackey reports, this is not a surprise to government officials.

Moody's says because Illinois did not extend higher income tax rates, it could have to rely on what it calls "credit negative" practices. Illinois already has the lowest credit rating of any state in the country. Moody's isn't lowering it further, at least not for now.

Illinois Governor Pat Quinn is continuing to make his case for keeping the state income tax rate at its current 5 percent. He didn’t get any help from Democratic lawmakers who passed a budget without taking up Quinn’s tax plan.

With the Illinois General Assembly’s spring session over, lawmakers aren’t scheduled to return to the Capitol until November. Two months of fierce debate over state spending and taxes culminated in a stalemate, so they passed a placeholder budget that will likely have to be revisited at the end of the year.

As the Illinois General Assembly considers a so-called "middle of the road" budget for next year, some programs could be cut or reduced to make up for the expiration of the 2011 income-tax hike. As IPR'S Hannah Meisel reports, advocates for people with disabilities say a reduction could be catastrophic for that population.

One of the biggest parts of Illinois' budget is Medicaid, which not only provides health care to the poor, but also to those with disabilities. Those who *can* live independently usually elect to with the help of in-home health service. 

Illinois Democrats are abandoning efforts to keep the income tax rate at its current level, and not let it drop. Illinois’ state income tax rate is scheduled to go down in January From five percent to 3-point-75.

Il lawmakers return to Springfield Monday

May 26, 2014

Illinois lawmakers return to Springfield Monday. With just six days remaining before the scheduled summer adjournment, , the state budget remains the top issue. IPR'S Brian Mackey has more.

Lawmakers have a difficult choice: slash spending on things like education and health care, or vote to make the current five percent income tax rate permanent. It's scheduled to drop by more than a percentage point at the end of the year.

The Illinois House has overwhelmingly rejected a 34.5 billion dollar "doomsday'" budget that would mean deep cuts to schools and social services next year. The budget plan was developed by legislative leaders after it became clear there weren't enough votes to support an earlier budget that relied on extending Illinois' temporary income tax increase.

Il House could vote on leaner budget Friday

May 23, 2014

The Illinois House of Representatives is preparing to vote on a budget that would make drastic cuts across state government. This is the budget Gov. Pat Quinn and other Democrats have been warning about. It would cut spending across Illinois government, from prisons to human services to schools.

Top Democrats moving forward on austerity budget?

May 22, 2014

A day after House Democrats said they're unwilling to extend Illinois' higher income tax rate, government observers are trying to figure out what happens next. Top Democrats say they're moving forward on an austerity budget, but as IPR'S Brian Mackey reports, things in the Statehouse are rarely as clear as they seem.

House Speaker Michael Madigan took a closed-door poll of his Democratic lawmakers, and found just 34 of the 60 votes needed to make the current income tax rate permanent. Madigan says he told his budget leaders to begin crafting a leaner spending plan, then added...

The question of whether to extend Illinois' temporary income tax increase has dominated the spring legislative session. Tuesday, Republicans are saying the question ought to be put to voters this fall. 

Brian Mackey / Illinois Public Radio/WUIS

Governor Pat Quinn appealed directly to Democrats in the Illinois House Monday. As IPR'S Brian Mackey reports, he’s struggling to win support for his plan to extend Illinois’ higher income tax rate.

The governor appeared at a closed meeting of the Illinois House Democratic caucus. Quinn is trying to win the support of the 60 Democrats required to make Illinois’ 5 percent income-tax rate permanent instead of letting it decline by more than a percentage point as scheduled at the end of the year.