Asian Carp

Mike Licht / CC BY 2.0 / Flickr

Some members of Congress want a one-year deadline for completing a federal study on keeping Asian carp out of the Great Lakes by strengthening defenses on a crucial Illinois waterway.

In a letter Thursday to heads of House spending committees, 26 lawmakers from Great Lakes states say the next federal budget should order the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to finish its Brandon Road Lock and Dam study by February 2019.

 

Greg Hume / Wikimedia Commons

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) - Illinois officials have released detailed plans for how they'll reintroduce a giant fish that was thought to be extinct from the state's waters. 

Flickr Creative Commons/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Headquarters

Federal officials are delaying a proposal for a new line of defense in the Chicago area to prevent Asian carp from reaching the Great Lakes.  The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers was scheduled to release a draft plan today for installing new technologies or taking other steps to block the invasive fish's path at the Brandon Road Lock and Dam near Joliet, Illinois.  No new release date has been set.

(AP) - Federal officials say they'll continue efforts to prevent Asian carp from reaching the Great Lakes, despite uncertainty about what Donald Trump might propose.

In a small pond in Wisconsin,  a recent study took place that could have some big implications when it comes to the spread of Asian Carp.  
 
The invasive species threatens to take over waterways, like the Great Lakes. It's already become a major problem in the Illinois and Mississippi Rivers and elsewhere.  

Twelve jobs will soon be added to Peoria’s employment roles after the city council Tues. rezoned property to allow meat processing and packaging.

Kencor Company will now move its operation from Kenosha, Wisconsin to Peoria and begin operations this fall on Precast Way.

The company will process catfish, using the fish body for human consumption, primarily by ethnic groups. The remainder of the fish will be used for animal food. Company president Kevin Evans says the oven at the new facility will meet air quality standards.

berniedup / Flickr/Creative Commons

CHICAGO (AP) - A giant fish that once swam from the Gulf of Mexico to Illinois is making a comeback.

Biologists are restocking alligator gar in several states where it disappeared about a half-century ago, partly in the hope that it will be a powerful weapon against Asian carp. That invasive species has been swimming almost unchecked toward the Great Lakes for decades. 

It turns out that alligator gar have a taste for carp - and also dwarf the invaders. Asian carp can grow to 4 feet and 100 pounds; alligator gar can grow more than 9 feet and 300 pounds.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers photo by Jessica Vandrick / Flikr Creative Commons

A federal study says small fish can be trapped in water currents created by commercial barges and pulled through electric barriers designed to prevent invasive Asian carp from reaching the Great Lakes.  The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says tests show that fish swimming near barges can remain caught between them for substantial distances. 

Federal agencies plan to spend $57.3 million this year on preventing invasive Asian carp from reaching the Great Lakes, where scientists say they could disrupt food chains and out-compete native fish.

The taste of a regional asset

Feb 24, 2015
Tanya Koonce / Peoria Public Radio

Those with regional economic development interests gathered at Two-25 restaurant in Peoria Tuesday night for an Asian Carp tasting. 

Asian Carp for dinner

Sep 16, 2014
Tanya Koonce / Peoria Public Radio

Asian Carp have become an accepted part of the Illinois River. The invasive species is estimated to make-up 70 percent of the river’s aquatic life. Now they’re also making their way to the table at one of Peoria’s more sophisticated restaurants. Edge Restaurant in Junction City specializes in farm to table local fresh products and Monday night the menu was Asian Carp. Peoria Public Radio’s Tanya Koonce attended the dinner event and filed this report:   

Chef Dustin Allen is tossing what he calls a screaming hot pan full of white fish. He’s preparing the second of a four course meal for about 30 people. 

Western Illinois University faculty members are researching ways to mitigate Asian carp in the upper Mississippi River basin. IPR’s Emily Boyer reports they’ve received 30-thousand dollars of federal funds for a second year of the study.

Flying Fish Festival kicks off in July

Jan 17, 2014

Some area businesses and organizations are working to bring more awareness to the Asian carp population in the Illinois River through the launch of a new festival.

Minnesota Public Radio

There’s been some tension among the Great Lakes states over what to do about Asian carp spreading from the Mississippi River system to Lake Michigan. The two bodies of water join at the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal that links to the Des Plaines and into the Illinois River.

At their weekend meeting on Mackinac Island, The Great Lakes Council of Governors agreed to adopt a common strategy to fight the spread of invasive species. Illinois Governor Pat Quinn endorsed the concept of sealing off the Great Lakes from the Mississippi River basin.