clean energy

Tanya Koonce / Peoria Public Radio

 

The Future Energy Jobs Act or FEJA is a year old. A bipartisan chorus of elected officials, union and business leaders are heralding it for making a significant impact in the state economy.

Clean Energy Deal On Uncertain Footing

Apr 24, 2017
Mike Gifford / Flickr/Creative Commons

Some derided last year’s sweeping energy law as a bailout for power giant Exelon. But it was also a major win for environmentalists — who are now hedging their bets against Illinois’ budget problems.

Cheerleaders, a pep band, and hundreds of happy Exelon workers welcomed Governor Bruce Rauner to northwest Illinois today (wed). At Riverdale High School in Port Byron, he signed the bill that will keep open nuclear power plants in Cordova, near the Quad Cities, and Clinton in central Illinois. Illinois Public Radio's Herb Trix reports. 

Rauner congratulated the General Assembly for approving the Future Energy Jobs Bill. 

A Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate is taking issue with the president's Clean Power Plan.  Andrea Zopp is not a global warming denier.

Wikimedia Commons

First, Exelon said that it would wait a year before making decisions on two money-losing nuclear plants in northern Illinois. Now, the Chicago-based energy company says it will also wait a year before deciding what to do with the Clinton nuclear power plant in DeWitt County.

So-called "clean energy" measures to encourage using solar or wind-generated power and keeping nuclear power plants profitable have stalled in the Illinois General Assembly as the spring session winds down. 

Proposed clean energy reward could strain local governemnts

Apr 21, 2015
Peoria Public Radio

A plan to financially reward Exelon for producing carbon-free nuclear energy would cost 1.6 billion dollars over five years, according to a study by Kestler Energy Consulting.