Comptroller Susana Mendoza

The Illinois Senate has endorsed monthly reporting of incoming bills despite a veto by Gov. Bruce Rauner.

Illinois is chasing a moving target as it tries to dig out of the nation's worst budget crisis, and $7.5 billion worth of unpaid bills hadn't even been sent to the official who writes the checks by the end of June.

The Illinois comptroller has appealed a Cook County judge's ruling that state lawmakers must be paid on time despite their failure to pass a budget.
 
Illinois Comptroller Susana Mendoza said Wednesday that Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan's office filed the appeal on her behalf Tuesday. The judge ruled last week in favor of several lawmakers who sued Mendoza's predecessor asking for pay.
 
Mendoza said she would release legislator back pay but also planned to appeal.
 

Flickr Creative Commons/frankieleon

A Cook County judge ruled Illinois’ comptroller cannot delay paying the salaries of state lawmakers during the budget impasse.  

A feud between Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner and Comptroller Susana Mendoza is escalating over spending priorities during the state's unprecedented budget standoff.  Mendoza is a Democrat in charge of paying Illinois' bills. In a speech she accused Rauner of being a terrible governor and paying consultants from a health care fund, among other things.   

A new poll says Illinois voters are divided on what to do about the state’s financial problems.

The poll puts Illinois' deficit at $10 billion, and gives voters three choices for how to fix it: raise taxes, cut "waste and inefficiency," or both.

Cuts were the most popular answer at 45 percent. Just 11 percent favored only raising taxes; about a third said do both.

Paradoxically, when you ask voters about specific areas to cut, most are rejected. Support was strongest for spending on education, poor people, and individuals with disabilities.

Gov. Bruce Rauner makes his annual budget address Wed. before the Illinois General Assembly. Democrats say Rauner has never introduced a balanced budget. The governor disagrees.

Illinois is in its 20th month without a state budget, and the question of who's to blame depends on whom you ask: Comptroller Susana Mendoza, a Democrat, or Gov. Rauner, a Republican.

"The governor's job is to introduce a balanced budget. He hasn't done that, and there's no way to sugarcoat that. That is not an alternative fact; that is a true fact," Mendoza said. 

Politicians of all parties often sidestep awkward questions.

Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner followed that tradition during a stop at Heartland Community College in Normal on Wednesday.

  Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner delivered his third State of the State speech WEDNESDAY. Brian Mackey reports it comes amid a protracted political fight that's decimated parts of state government.

 

The State of the State address is usually a time when governors tout accomplishments.