constitution

A lawyer for former Republican Rep. Aaron Schock says prosecutors are aiming to be the first to imprison a former member of Congress over ambiguous rules the U.S. House set for itself.

Some advocates are pushing for an Illinois constitutional amendment to change how legislative districts are created in the state.

The Justice Department says in a new filing in former U.S. Rep. Aaron Schock's corruption case that a 1995 ruling that's long provided guidance in the prosecution of politicians is wrong.

There are signs key portions of the corruption case against former U.S. Rep. Aaron Schock may be at risk of unraveling.

More than a dozen groups and lawmakers who oppose abortion have filed a lawsuit challenging a new law providing taxpayer-funded abortions.

A former legislator has filed a lawsuit in Cook County seeking to recover money he lost when state lawmakers voted to reject annual cost-of-living pay adjustments. Michael Noland, a Democratic former state senator from Elgin, filed the lawsuit. He says the state constitution prohibits midterm salary changes. 

Former U.S. Rep. Aaron Schock has asked a judge to toss the corruption case against him, arguing that authorities misinterpreted the law and overreached.  Lawyers for the Illinois Republican filed the motion to dismiss the case in a Springfield federal court. Among their other arguments is that the indictment trespasses on land the Constitution reserves for Congress.

For the second time, a court has deemed unconstitutional a citizen's initiative to limit how long Illinois lawmakers can serve. First, it was a Cook County Circuit Court judge. Now, the decision is from a state appellate court.

Illinois voters will be asked to weigh in on at least two changes to the Illinois Constitution at this November's election. Both measures got final approval Thursday in the Senate.