Peoria

Peoria School District 150 says it wants voters to consider a one-percent sales tax increase on some retail sales.  Peoria Public Radio’s Alex Rusciano reports the District says new revenues are needed amid shrinking property tax and state aid funding: 

 District 150 is expecting a $10 million decrease in general state aid next school year.  District 150 also lost nearly four-million-dollars in property tax revenues the last two years.  Officials say that means less money for roof repairs, technology upgrades and health-life safety projects.  School Board member Rick Cloyd says he supports asking Peoria County voters to consider a one-percent sales tax increase:

Peoria’s Warehouse District is moving forward. Local, state and federal officials gathered in downtown Peoria for a symbolic ground-breaking. The event kicks off the Warehouse District and Washington Street improvement projects. U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood joined Mayor Jim Ardis, former Mayor Dick Carver and others to kick-off the $30 million effort.

The Peoria man who allegedly murdered his wife on Valentine's Day was seeing a young Lithuanian woman in the United States.  Multiple media outlets are reporting that was the message during a 20-minute bond-hearing for Nathan Leuthold. Prosecutors say Leuthold met the woman in Chicago about 20 times and also bought her clothes. A Peoria Police Detective also reportedly told prosecutors that they found a handwritten note believed to be from Leuthold’s wife, Denise. The note said she knew he wanted her dead and running around with a 20-year-old was making her look bad.

This week, we're talking with George Stelluto, Music Director of the Peoria Symphony Orchestra. Their concert Saturday night features music of Mozart, Rossini, Maurice Ravel and Jacques Ibert. Stelluto talks about the pieces on the program and how they fit together. The concert will also feature a performance by winners of the Peoria Symphony Guild's young artist competition.

Don't Shoot Peoria

"Don't Shoot" is a community-wide effort to reduce gun violence in the Peoria area. The local initiative ties in with the book "Don't Shoot" by criminologist and author David Kennedy. This program is collaboration between federal, state, and local law enforcement, prosecutors, as well as community members and leaders. This is the first of four roundtable discussions of the "Don't Shoot" project on WCBU, and it examines the history of the anti-violence initiative and how it will apply to the Peoria region.

This week, we talk with William Butler from the Contemporary Art Center. They're hosting their annual Fine Art Auction Saturday night from 7:00 to 10:00 p.m. The event includes both a silent and a live auction, along with musical entertainment. Butler talks about some of the works featured in the auction, how it's designed to benefit both the Center and the participating artists, and some of the other ongoing activities at the CAC.

Corn Stock Theatre presents a rock-and-roll story of gender identity, set to music inspired by 1970s “glam” rock, with its production of “Hedwig and the Angry Inch.” Douglas Okey has this review for WCBU and the Live Theatre  League of Peoria. Opinions expressed are those of the reviewer, not those of WCBU or the Live Theatre League.

This week, we're talking with Chip Joyce. He' s playing the title role in "Hedwig and the Angry Inch," which continues tonight and tomorrow night at Corn Stock Theatre. Joyce talks about the origin of the show, the process of "becoming Hedwig" each night, and what it's like fronting the Angry Inch -- the on-stage band that peforms during the show.

Pages